DVD

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DVD

abbrevation for digital video disk, an optical computer disk that is used to digitally store large graphic and video content in two layers (gold and silver). A DVD can hold many gigabytes of information. Commercial DVDs contain entire motion pictures or other video data. Compare compact disc.

DVD

Digital versatile disk, digital video disk Informatics An optical disk capable of storing ≥ 4 GB of audiovisual data. Cf CD.

DVD,

n the acronym for digital versatile disk or digital video disk. A high-density compact disk for storing large amounts of data, especially high-resolution audio-video material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Universal Pictures supports only the HD DVD format.
ODME also showed its Miniliner monoline system for CDs and DVDs and its uv bonding system for all DVD formats.
For now, all of the DVD formats have been adopted by significant computer manufacturers, each for their own reasons.
The HD DVD format is competing with the Blu-ray format promoted by a Sony Corp.
Today, seven different DVD Format Verification Labs are in full operation around the globe.
We are very proud of being selected by Universal to help lead efforts in extending their customer's viewing experience to the powerful new HD DVD format," said Trevor Kaufman, CEO, Schematic.
This brings the total number of units shipped since the launch of the DVD format to nearly 4.
The Blu-ray Disc format is competing with the HD DVD format to become the technological standard for next-generation DVDs.
In separate statements released the same day, the four Hollywood studios voiced support for the HD DVD format because of advanced cost performance and copyright protection.
New Line Cinema, the minimajor behind ``The Lord of the Rings'' trilogy, also announced Monday that it plans to release titles in the HD DVD format.
Use a standard DVD burner to convert HD DVD format discs straight to standard DVD media; and,
Last year's revenues increased nearly $2 billion from 2001, fueled mainly by the rapidly growing DVD format, which also set a sales record and made major inroads in the rental arena still dominated by VHS.