DSM-IV


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DSM-IV

 
abbreviation for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition), prepared by the Task Force on Nomenclature and Statistics of the American Psychiatric Association. It is the Association's official manual of mental disorders and provides detailed descriptions of categories of disorders as well as diagnostic criteria. Disorders are placed on one of five axes: axis I includes all the clinical syndromes and V codes except for personality disorders and mental retardation; axis II includes the personality disorders and mental retardation; axis III lists any coexisting physical disorders or conditions; axis IV assesses the severity of psychosocial and environmental stressors; and axis V consists of a global assessment of functioning, using a 100 point scale assessing the highest level of functioning during the past year and the current level of functioning.

DSM-IV

Psychiatry The current DSM, which standardizes criteria for diagnosing psychiatric nosologies. See DSM.

DSM-IV

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). This reference book, published by the American Psychiatric Association, is the diagnostic standard for most mental health professionals in the United States.
Mentioned in: Bipolar Disorder

DSM-IV,

n.pr See Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV.

DSM-IV

n a publication of the American Psychiatric Association that classifies mental conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Structured clinical interview for DSM-IV axis I disorders (SCID-I): Structured clinical interview for DSM-IV axis I disorders, clinical version (SCID-CV): The SCID-I is a semi-structured diagnostic interview chart whose Turkish translation and validity/reliability were carried out by Corapgoglu and colleagues (18).
Bailey also broke down overall risks by DSM-IV diagnosis.
In this vein, the present study aims to analyze the diagnostic concordance between the DSM-IV and the DSM-5 in PTSD diagnosis in a clinical sample of victims of traumatic events entering treatment.
Both were informed about aim and procedures of the study and the necessity of a complete and detailed documentation of the psychopathology, course of illness and final diagnostic decision for each participating patient; they were also encouraged to consult the DSM-IV manual [sup][9] and use all information available (e.
Two versions of the survey were created and distributed randomly across the cohort; one version of the study listed the DSM-IV PCL-S questions first, the other survey had the PCL-5 version first.
It includes a 10-year epidemiological forecast for the total prevalent cases of acute insomnia, chronic insomnia (not fulfilling DSM-IV criteria), chronic primary insomnia, and chronic secondary insomnia, segmented by sex and age (in 15-year age groups beginning at 15 years and ending at =75 years) in these markets.
On the basis of thorough literature reviews, expert opinions and active debates in efforts to reach consensus, each work group made specific proposals to change, modify, or eliminate DSM-IV criteria and drafted new diagnoses for DSM-5.
Nor did the DSM-IV adequately address lifespan perspective, he said, including variations of symptom presentation across the developmental trajectory, or cultural perspectives.
La propuesta de distintos autores con respecto a la decision final que deberia tomarse por parte de los responsables globales del DSM-5 era la de relegar la propuesta del Grupo de trabajo de los trastornos de la personalidad a la seccion 3 relativa a "constructos clinicos que necesitan de mas estudios" y que se continuase incluyendo las categorias y criterios diagnosticos del DSM-IV en la seccion oficial de los trastornos mentales del DSM-5 (seccion 2) (dado que no habria tiempo para modificar sustancialmente la propuesta de dicho Grupo de trabajo) (Emmelkamp y Power, 2012; Livesley, 2012; Verheul, 2012).
The DSM IV-TR was published in 2000 and was only a slight variation of the original DSM-IV (Keely et al.
2009) that demonstrated that "clinicians find dimensional trait approaches significantly less relevant and useful, and consider them worse, than the current DSM-IV system" (p.
Several diagnostic tools for personality disorders based on the DSM-IV (5) or the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) (6) had been translated into Chinese (Mandarin) and validated in Mainland China (Table 17-9).