DSM-III-R

DSM-III-R

Psychiatry Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders–3rd Edition Revised; a classification system for mental illnesses developed by the American Psychiatric Association, currently in its 4th edition, DSM IV
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Such concerns led the APA to abandon the hierarchy model of DSM-III-R (a limited 1987 reworking of the manual).
DSM-III-R refined criteria for several diagnoses and added 27 new entities thus totaling 292 different categories.
The exclusion criterion narrowed between the DSM-III-R (APA, 1987) and the DSM-IV (APA, 1994), by shortening the time frame to 2 months (previously 1 year), requiring (previously suggesting) a diagnosis of major depression if a single exclusion symptom was present, and adding psychosis to the list of complicating symptoms (Wakefield, Schmitz, & Baer, 2011).
The biaxial concept was generalized to all drugs of abuse (Edwards, Arif, & Hodgson, 1981), and the distinction between dependence and its consequences guided the separate classifications for substance dependence and substance abuse in the DSM-III-R and DSM-IV-TR (Rounsaville, Spitzer, & Williams, 1986).
In addition (but this is mostly true for the DSMs after the DSM-III, starting with the DSM-III-R of 1987), psychiatrists have often been pressured by outside groups, such as pharmaceutical companies, to increase the number of disorders or to expand the territory that they cover (Demazeux 2011).
The DSM-III-R quickly followed the DSM-III due to APA's justification of a revision in light of the time between the DSM-III and the publication of the DSM-IV, and a need to integrate accumulated research into the document.
PMDD first appeared as "late luteal phase dysphoric disorder" in Appendix A of the DSM-III-R in 1987, over the objections of some women's groups and clinicians, who viewed its inclusion as pathologizing the menstrual cycle.
The DSM-III-R then stated that this descriptor could be applied if the individual being assessed displayed "distress about a pattern of repeated sexual conquests or other forms of non-paraphillic sexual addiction, involving a succession of people who exist only as things to be used.
Beginning with DSM-III-R, the criteria used to diagnose substance use disorders were applied more or less equally to all of the substances that are commonly misused by individuals.
The hierarchical exclusionary rules affecting up to 60% of diagnoses (Corcoran & Walsh, 2006) were first introduced in the DSM-III-R and have sharpened the diagnostic process by providing guidelines to rule out disorders and more confidently apply a specific diagnosis.
An indication of this importance was the publication of a special section on the DSM-III-R in the June 1993 issue of Counselor Education and Supervision (Seligman, 1999).