DNA computing

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DNA computing

n.
Molecular computing using DNA molecules.
The manipulation of data represented by strings of DNA base pairs instead of binary digits, with calculations carried out by common manipulations—e.g., combining, copying, and extracting strands
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there are many problems in DNA cryptography, scientists are trying to solve them because they believe that, with the extraordinary information density and the vast parallelism that are inherent in DNA computers, it is possible to make a secure system.
As time goes by, your DNA computer may start to dissolve.
I wouldn't worry about DNA computers giving the PCB a run for its money any time soon.
Some experts believe home-based DNA computers are possible but for now think they'll be better suited in corporate or government settings, solving voluminous calculations, cracking secret codes, or helping the government with its current war on terrorism.
Japan's major precision-instruments maker said the main feature of what it calls the ''world's first functional DNA computer for gene analysis'' is that it reduces the time required for gene expression profiling to about six hours from three days typically taken by the conventional manual process with DNA microarrays.
If successful, the results will be checked against a national DNA computer base of known offenders in the hope of providing a positive match.
To test his prototype of a DNA computer, Adelman posed a difficult mathematical challenge known as the traveling salesman problem: What is the shortest route among a group of cities, not all of which are connected by a direct road, that lets a salesman pass through each city exactly once?
We don't know if we can build a DNA computer, though we think we can.
For example, the parallel DNA computer created by Leonard Adelman at the Univ.
However, the real power of DNA computers lies in their inherent parallelism.
The ITP covers developments in and around the nanometre and molecular level and covers such topics as motors, sensors and transistors using nanomaterials, quantum computers and DNA computers.
DNA computers built from strands of synthetic DNA have been coaxed into performing relatively complex calculations, according to a report in Nature.