EMS

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EMS

EMS

abbr.
1. electrical muscle stimulation
2. Emergency Medical Service
3. European Monetary System

EMS

1 abbreviation for electric muscle stimulator.
2 abbreviation for emergency medical service.
3 abbreviation for eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome. See eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome, tryptophan induced.

EMS

Abbreviation for:
early morning stiffness
electrical muscle stimulation
electromagnetic spectrum
electronic medical service
electrophoretic mobility shift
emergency medical services 
emergency medical system
eosinophilia myalgia syndrome
expandable metal stent
extramural study

EMS

Emergency medical service, see there.

EMS

Abbreviation for emergency medical services.

EMS

Abbrev. for Emergency Medical Service.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here are some practical minimal hardware requirements for multitasking with DESQview.
DESQview can be installed from any floppy drive by changing to that drive and typing "install.
This also is where you decide if DESQview will manage communication and printer ports.
Actually, much of my satisfaction with DESQview derives from QEMM, Quarterdeck's dynamite memory manager for computers with an 80386 microprocessor.
If so, multitasking is the capability you seek and DESQview (about $125 mail order) is one sure way to get it.
While DESQview tackles Windows at the techie fringes, GeoWorks Ensemble (about $115 mail order) attempts to outclass the Microsoft product at the other end of the range.
Many of these promised features - the Presentation Manager interface for one (for an altemative see DESQView below) - are not now available, and faced with the challenge of providing both backward compatibility with DOS and forward compatibility with new applications, they have been continually delayed.
DESQView sits on top of ale DOS operating system and provides a windowing type environment, but unlike Presentation Manager, the planned interface for OS/2 micros, it can be used today with all of the software you already own.
Together with its expanded memory manager (QEMM-386) for 80386 chip machines, which is either sold separately or together as a package called DESQView 386, it is a sound alternative to Windows, but one that has just not taken off yet.