cytoskeleton

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cytoskeleton

 [si″to-skel´ĕ-ton]
a conspicuous internal reinforcement in the cytoplasm of a cell, consisting of tonofibrils, filaments of the terminal web, and other microfilaments. adj., adj cytoskel´etal.

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-ton),
In cells, the microtubules and the filaments (thin, intermediate, and thick) that serve as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize the location and movement of intracellular organelles.

cytoskeleton

/cy·to·skel·e·ton/ (-skel´it-on) a conspicuous internal reinforcement in the cytoplasm of a cell, consisting of tonofibrils, filaments of the terminal web, and other microfilaments.cytoskel´etal

cytoskeleton

(sī′tə-skĕl′ĭ-tn)
n.
The internal framework of a eukaryotic cell, composed of protein filaments that provide structural support and drive the movement of the cell and its internal components, typically divided into three categories (microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules) based on the diameter and composition of the filaments.

cy′to·skel′e·tal (-ĭ-tl) adj.

cytoskeleton

[-skel′ətən]
Etymology: Gk, kytos + skeletos, dried body
the cytoplasmic elements, including the tonofibrils, keratin, and other microfibrils, that function as a supportive system within a cell, especially an epithelial cell.

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
The tonofilaments, keratin, desmin, neurofilaments, or other intermediate filaments serving as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize intracellular organelles.

cytoskeleton

A complex network of ACTIN filaments within the nucleated cell. Unlike the bony skeleton in vertebrates, this skeleton has contractile properties and can alter the shape, size and even movement, of the cell. The cytoskeleton is also concerned with the adhesion of adjacent cells.

cytoskeleton

a network of MICROTUBULES and MICROFILAMENTS in the cytoplasm of cells which is thought to give the cell its characteristic shape. The network enables the movement of specific organelles within the cytoplasm (as in vesicles produced by the GOLGI APPARATUS), and the production of general CYTOPLASMIC STREAMING.

cytoskeleton

network of keratinocyte-derived keratin filaments and desmosomal connections providing structural support to epidermal basal cell layer, and aiding epidermis/dermis adhesion

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
The tonofilaments, keratin, desmin, neurofilaments, or other intermediate filaments serving as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize intracellular organelles.

cytoskeleton,

n the intracellular filaments that serve to support or stiffen cells.

cytoskeleton

a conspicuous internal reinforcement in the cytoplasm of a cell, consisting of tonofibrils, filaments of the terminal web, and other microfilaments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Immunostaining of Cytoskeletal Proteins in Normal, Ganglionic, and Aganglionic Bowel From a Patient With Hirschprung Disease (HD) Normal HD Ganglionic ++ + [+ or -] - ++ + [+ or -] - Dystrophin 4 4 .
Contractile and cytoskeletal proteins in smooth muscle during hypertrophy and its reversal.
Neurobehavioral deficits in mice lacking the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.
VASP recruitment to the bacterial surface in turn allows the recruitment of other cytoskeletal proteins, such as actin and profilin, and forms the basis of an actin-based motor for Shigella movement.
Intercellular spread of Shigella flexneri through a monolayer mediated by membranous protrusions and associated with reorganization of the cytoskeletal protein vinculin.
Role of caveolin-1 and cytoskeletal proteins, actin and vimentinm in adipogenesis of bovine intramuscular preadipocytes cells.
Alterations of cytoskeletal protein sulfhydryls and cellular glutathione in cultured cells exposed to cadmium and nickel ions.
Detailing these pathways in the regulation of cell motility and cytoskeletal proteins (Alfred Nordheim, University of Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany; Herrup), synapse development (Michael E.
Kinesins are a class of cytoskeletal proteins that translate chemical energy into mechanical force along intracellular filaments in order to carry out many important biological functions.
The subgroup, to be held on Saturday, December 14, 2002, will assemble a group of experts to discuss recent findings regarding the role of cytoskeletal proteins in human disease.
Further, cytoskeletal proteins have been implicated in the etiology or pathogenesis of a wide variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory disease, fungal, bacterial and viral infections, and neurodegenerative disease.