cyclooxygenase

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Related to Cyclo-oxygenase: Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors

cyclooxygenase

 [si″klo-ok´sĭ-jĕ-nās]
an activity of the enzyme prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase.

pros·ta·glan·din en·do·per·ox·ide syn·thase

a protein complex that catalyzes two steps in prostaglandin biosynthesis; the cyclooxygenase activity (which is inhibited by aspirin and indomethacin) converts arachidonate and 2O2 to prostaglandin G2; the hydroperoxidase activity uses glutathione to convert prostaglandin G2 to prostaglandin H2.
Synonym(s): cyclooxygenase

cyclooxygenase

/cy·clo·oxy·gen·ase/ (-ok´sĭ-jen-ās) a component of prostaglandin synthase (q.v.).

cyclooxygenase

(sī′klō-ŏk′sĭ-jə-nās′, -nāz′)
n.
1. See COX-1.
2. See COX-2.

cyclooxygenase

[si′klō·ok′səjĕnās]
an activity of the enzyme prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase.

Cyclooxygenase

An enzyme, found in most tissues, that helps turn some fatty acids into protaglandins.
Mentioned in: Cox-2 Inhibitors
References in periodicals archive ?
Aspirin produces irreversible inhibition of COX; the synthesis of prostaglandins becomes dependent on the production of new cyclo-oxygenase enzyme.
The mechanism of action of NANSAIDs and aspirin is mediated by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis through an interaction with the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase.
Since indomethacin is an inhibitor of the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase, the authors suggest that this inhibition confirms the presence of the enzyme in the plant extracts.
Some were taking a high dose of lumiracoxib, a type of drug known as a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor.
amazonica, anti-inflammatory activity relied on cyclo-oxygenase inhibition.
This naturally derived compound is not a selective cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitor.
While their data from glucose clamp and brachial artery ultrasound are reassuring, many examples demonstrate the hazards of extrapolating patient-oriented outcomes from intermediate physiologic endpoints (eg, measured cyclo-oxygenase blocking activity vs hospitalizations from gastrointestinal hemorrhage).
Salix extracts have several anti-inflammatory targets including effects on both forms of cyclo-oxygenase.
The enzyme, called cyclo-oxygenase (COX), causes the local production of chemicals called prostaglandins, which amplify pain signals.
Aspirin and most other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs work by blocking prostaglandin synthesis by cyclo-oxygenase, another enzyme that can initiate arachidonic acid breakdown.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs work by blocking an enzyme called cyclo-oxygenase, which exists in the body in two forms, COX-1 and COX-2.
To the Editor: The cyclo-oxygenase (2) (COX-2) inhibitors and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been the subject of scrutiny generated mainly by evidence suggesting that rofecoxib is associated with increased cardiovascular risk.