triad

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triad

 [tri´ad]
1. an element with a valence of three.
2. a group of three similar bodies, or a complex composed of three items or units.
acute compression triad Beck's triad.
Andersen's triad Andersen's syndrome.
Beck's triad rising venous pressure, falling arterial pressure, and small quiet heart; characteristic of cardiac compression; called also acute compression triad.
Cushing's triad decreased pulse, increased blood pressure, and a widening pulse pressure associated with increased intracranial pressure; it is a late clinical sign and may indicate brainstem herniation.
Hutchinson's triad diffuse interstitial keratitis, labyrinthine disease, and Hutchinson's teeth, seen in congenital syphilis.
Saint's triad hiatus hernia, colonic diverticula, and cholelithiasis.

tri·ad

(trī'ad),
1. A collection of three things having something in common.
2. The transverse tubule and the terminal cisternae on each side of it in skeletal muscle fibers.
3. Synonym(s): portal triad
4. The father, mother, and child relationship projectively experienced in group psychotherapy.
[G. trias (triad-), the number 3, fr. treis, three]

triad

/tri·ad/ (tri´ad)
1. any trivalent element.
2. a group of three associated entities or objects.

Beck's triad  rising venous pressure, falling arterial pressure, and small quiet heart; characteristic of cardiac compression.
Currarino's triad  a complex of congenital anomalies in the anococcygeal region, in varying combinations and degrees, with scimitar sacrum; presacral anterior meningocele, teratoma or cyst; and rectal malformations.
Hutchinson's triad  diffuse interstitial keratitis, labyrinthine disease, and Hutchinson's teeth, seen in congenital syphilis.
Saint's triad  hiatus hernia, colonic diverticula, and cholelithiasis.

triad

[trī′əd]
Etymology: Gk, trias, three
a combination of three, such as two parents and a child.

triad

Medspeak
A trilogy of clinical or pathologic findings, first described as typical for a particular disease but which often prove nonspecific.

Sexology
Three people, two of one sex and one of the other, in a continuing relationship of emotional and sexual involvement; i.e., a threesome with an emotional component.

triad

A trilogy of clinical or pathologic findings, first described as typical for
a particular disease, which often prove to be nonspecific. See Asthma triad, Autonomic triad, Behçet's triad, Carney's triad, Christian's triad, Charcot's triad, Epidemiologic triad, Female athlete triad, Hemochromatosis triad, Lennox's triad, Negative triad, Petit's triad, Renal cell carcinoma triad, Saint's triad, Somatostatinoma triad, Toxoplasmosis triad, Trotter's triad, Virchow's triad, Waterhouse-Friderichsen triad, Whipple's triad, Wilson's triad.

tri·ad

(trī'ad)
1. A group of three things with something in common.
2. The transverse tubule and the terminal cisternae on each side of it in skeletal muscle fibers.
3. Synonym(s): portal triad.
4. psychology/psychiatry The father-mother-child relationship projectively experienced in group psychotherapy.
[G. trias (triad-), the number 3, fr. treis, three]

tri·ad

(trī'ad)
1. A collection of three things with something in common.
2. The transverse tubule and the terminal cisternae on each side of it in skeletal muscle fibers.
[G. trias (triad-), the number 3, fr. treis, three]

triad

1. an element with a valence of three.
2. a group of three similar bodies, or a complex composed of three items or units.

t's of the tarsus
the various combinations of (usually three) injuries that occur in trauma to the hock joint, based first on injury to the central tarsal bone.
Virchow's triad
Whipple's triad