curie

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curie

 (Ci) [ku´re]
a unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 × 1010.

Curie

Marie (1867-193) and Pierre (1859-1906), French chemists and physicists and Nobel laureates (wife and husband). See: curium.

cu·rie (C, c, Ci),

(kyū'rē),
A unit of measurement of radioactivity, 3.70 ×1010 disintegrations per second; formerly defined as the radioactivity of the amount of radon in equilibrium with 1 g radium; superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).
[Marie (1867-1934) and Pierre (1859-1906) Curie, French chemists and physicists and Nobel laureates]

curie

/cu·rie/ (Ci) (ku´re) a unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 × 1010.

curie (Ci)

[kyoo͡r′ē]
Etymology: Marie Skladowska Curie, Polish-born chemist and physicist, 1867-1934; Pierre Curie, French chemist and physicist, 1859-1906; both Nobel laureates
a unit of radioactivity used before adoption of the becquerel (Bq) as the SI unit. It is equal to 3.70 × 1010 Bq.

curie

An obsolete unit of radioactivity (i.e., radioactive decay) equal to 3.7 x 1010 disintegrations/sec of a radioactive nuclide, roughly equivalent to the activity of 1 g of radium; the curie was replaced by the SI-derived unit for radioactivity, the Becquerel (2.70 x 10-11 curies).

cu·rie

(Ci) (kyūr'ē)
A unit of measurement of radioactivity, 3.70 × 1010 disintegrations per second; superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).

Curie,

Marie, French physicist, 1867-1934.
curie - a unit of measurement of radioactivity.

Curie,

Pierre, French physicist, 1859-1906.
curie - a unit of measurement of radioactivity.

cu·rie

(C) (kyūr'ē)
A unit of measurement of radioactivity superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).

curie (kyŏŏ´rē),

a measurement of radioactivity produced by the disintegration of unstable elements. The curie is that quantity of a radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 times 1010. Because the curie is a relatively large unit, the millicurie (0.00 curie) and the microcurie (one-millionth of a curie) are more often used. The curie is based on the number of nuclear disintegrations and not on the number or amount of radiations emitted.

curie

a non-SI unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.7 × 1010; abbreviated Ci. Now replaced by the becquerel.
References in periodicals archive ?
What this volume offers is insight into how Curie herself took charge of her intellectual property, including her own persona--both shaping and reflecting a rapidly changing world, in which a new capacity for celebrity raised fresh challenges about the management of information.
Marie Curie was born Maria Sklodowska in Warsaw in 1867 during a period when the Polish nation was subsumed under of the repressive regime of the Russian czars.
It would be a beautiful thing," Pierre Curie wrote to Marie, "if we could spend our life near each other, hypnotized by our dreams: your patriotic dream, our humanitarian dream and our scientific dream.
At 35, Pierre Curie was eight years older than Marie and had already done work that should have been well known in scientific circles: His study of crystals had led him to postulate important laws of symmetry, and he had been conducting experiments in magnetism that would produce enduring laws.
The rain and the traffic were heavy that day as Pierre Curie approached rue Dauphine, just a block from the Institut library along the Seine where he planned to do some reading.
At the purpose-built hospice in the West End of Newcastle, Marie Curie Cancer Care cares for over 400 people from across the North East as inpatients as well as offering an extensive day service for out-patients.
Complementing the work at the Newcastle Hospice, Marie Curie Nurses work across the region to provide free care to patients with terminal cancer and other illnesses in their own homes.
Estelle Vasey, chairman of the Northern Rock Charity Committee, said: "Planting a daffodil bulb in the Marie Curie Field of Hope is a tangible way of remembering friends and loved ones and it looks so beautiful when they bloom in spring and of course they return each year to remind us.
The Field of Hope at the Marie Curie Hospice is to be planted tomorrow from 10.
In 1911 Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for producing a pure metal sample of radium and establishing the atomic weight of radium and polonium.
At the onset of World War I, and although she despised war, Curie donated she and her late husband's Nobel Prize medals to the French war effort (Pierre had died an untimely death in 1906).
On July 4, 1934, at the age of 67, Curie died of aplastic anemia, a blood disease that often results from radiation exposure.