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curie

 (Ci) [ku´re]
a unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 × 1010.

Curie

Marie (1867-193) and Pierre (1859-1906), French chemists and physicists and Nobel laureates (wife and husband). See: curium.

cu·rie (C, c, Ci),

(kyū'rē),
A unit of measurement of radioactivity, 3.70 ×1010 disintegrations per second; formerly defined as the radioactivity of the amount of radon in equilibrium with 1 g radium; superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).
[Marie (1867-1934) and Pierre (1859-1906) Curie, French chemists and physicists and Nobel laureates]

curie

/cu·rie/ (Ci) (ku´re) a unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 × 1010.

curie (Ci)

[kyoo͡r′ē]
Etymology: Marie Skladowska Curie, Polish-born chemist and physicist, 1867-1934; Pierre Curie, French chemist and physicist, 1859-1906; both Nobel laureates
a unit of radioactivity used before adoption of the becquerel (Bq) as the SI unit. It is equal to 3.70 × 1010 Bq.

curie

An obsolete unit of radioactivity (i.e., radioactive decay) equal to 3.7 x 1010 disintegrations/sec of a radioactive nuclide, roughly equivalent to the activity of 1 g of radium; the curie was replaced by the SI-derived unit for radioactivity, the Becquerel (2.70 x 10-11 curies).

cu·rie

(Ci) (kyūr'ē)
A unit of measurement of radioactivity, 3.70 × 1010 disintegrations per second; superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).

Curie,

Marie, French physicist, 1867-1934.
curie - a unit of measurement of radioactivity.

Curie,

Pierre, French physicist, 1859-1906.
curie - a unit of measurement of radioactivity.

cu·rie

(C) (kyūr'ē)
A unit of measurement of radioactivity superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).

curie (kyŏŏ´rē),

a measurement of radioactivity produced by the disintegration of unstable elements. The curie is that quantity of a radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 times 1010. Because the curie is a relatively large unit, the millicurie (0.00 curie) and the microcurie (one-millionth of a curie) are more often used. The curie is based on the number of nuclear disintegrations and not on the number or amount of radiations emitted.

curie

a non-SI unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.7 × 1010; abbreviated Ci. Now replaced by the becquerel.
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