cuneiform

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Related to Cuneiform script: Hammurabi, Chinese script

cuneiform

 [ku-ne´ĭ-form]
wedge-shaped; applied particularly to three of the tarsal bones of the foot. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.

cu·ne·i·form

(kū'ne-i-fōrm), Avoid the mispronunciation cune'iform.
Wedge-shaped. See: intermediate cuneiform (bone), lateral cuneiform (bone), medial cuneiform (bone).

cuneiform

/cu·ne·i·form/ (ku-ne´ĭ-form) wedge-shaped.

cuneiform

(kyo͞o′nē-ə-fôrm′, kyo͞o-nē′-)
adj.
1. Wedge-shaped.
2.
a. Of or relating to any of various related writing systems of the ancient Near East having characters formed by the arrangement of small wedge-shaped elements and used to write Sumerian, Akkadian, Elamite, Hittite, Old Persian, and other languages.
b. Relating to, composed in, or using such characters.
3. Anatomy Of, relating to, or being a wedge-shaped bone or cartilage.
n.
1. Cuneiform writing.
2. Anatomy A wedge-shaped bone, especially one of three such bones in the tarsus of the foot.

cuneiform

[kyo̅o̅nē′əfôrm′]
Etymology: L, cuneus, wedge, forma
1 adj, (of bone and cartilage) wedge-shaped.
2 n, bone of the foot between the navicular and metatarsals.

cu·ne·i·form

(kū'ne-i-fōrm)
1. Denotes anything wedge shaped.
2. Especially denotes three distal tarsal bones (i.e., the medial, lateral, and intermediate cuneiform bones).

cuneiform

1. Wedge-shaped.
2. One of the three wedge-shaped bones in the foot.

cuneate

; cuneiform wedge-shaped

cuneiform

1. wedge-shaped.
2. the first, second and third tarsal bones.

cuneiform process
processes of the arytenoid cartilage in dogs, or the epiglottic cartilages of horses.
References in periodicals archive ?
In China buildings were mostly on wooden frames and have not survived, and in Mesopotamia neither the mud bricks nor the cuneiform script lend themselves to ceremonial inscriptions in the same measure.
I do not intend to imply that the model I propose for the Canaanite use of cuneiform is to be extrapolated to every locality where both the cuneiform script and the Akkadian language were imported, nor to every text corpus wherein the form of Akkadian is discernibly affected by the local spoken languages.
Their use of the cuneiform script (but then, analogically, early Japanese writers must have believed themselves to be writing Chinese; see above, pp.
If the Berlin project thinks so questionable the "Sumerian hypothesis" - namely that the Sumerians were, if not the creators of the so-called Uruk culture, at least, the major players in the human drama that produced that culture and the cuneiform script that is a part of it - then sound historical methodology requires the clear formulating of a counter-hypothesis and evidence in support of it.
So, let us leave the ball in the Berlin court: if the Sumerians did not create the Uruk culture and cuneiform script, who did?
The writing technique imitated that of cuneiform script on clay tablets.
KAYSERy (CyHAN)- Cuneiform scripts which were discovered at the end of years-long excavations in Turkish central province of Kayseri were added to UNESCO's World Heritage List.
Five centuries old clay tablets on which cuneiform scripts were discovered are one of the newly added heritages.
17, 000 cuneiform scripts are displayed at the museum.
He said one piece carried cuneiform scripts and showed circular shapes with carvings on both sides, while the other was shaped in a small pyramid, carrying carvings on three sides.
Lesley Adkins, who has previously written works of reference and an account of the decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphs, treats the exploits of Henry Rawlinson, British Resident in Baghdad during 1843-1855, as a framework within which to repeat the story of how the cuneiform scripts were deciphered.
These artefacts are the first fragments from a scientific excavation to provide cuneiform scripts from the time of King Ispuini.