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culture

 [kul´cher]
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.
4. the shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people, which are transmitted from one generation to the next and are identified as patterns that guide the thinking and action of the group members. adj., adj cul´tural.
cell culture the maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro, or a culture of such cells.
blood culture microbiologic examination of a blood sample to check for presence of microorganisms.
continuous flow culture the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
enrichment culture one grown on a medium, usually liquid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a given type of organism.
hanging-drop culture a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture a cell or tissue culture made by direct transfer from a natural source to an artificial medium.
selective culture one grown on a medium, usually solid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a single species of microorganism. It may also include substances that inhibit the growth of other species.
shake culture a culture made by inoculating warm liquid agar culture medium in a tube and shaking to distribute contents evenly. Incubation of the resolidified culture allows the development of separated colonies; especially adaptable to obligate anaerobes.
slant culture one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
culture-specific syndrome folk illnesses that are unique to a particular culture or geographical area. Each illness has a cluster of symptoms, signs, and behavioral changes that are recognized by members of the culture; usually, they also have a range of symbolic meanings and culturally agreed-upon treatments. Anorexia nervosa and Type A behavior pattern are examples of syndromes specific to industrialized cultures.
stab culture a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture a culture in which the surface of a solid medium is inoculated by drawing across it, in a zig-zag fashion, a wire inoculating loop carrying the inoculum.
suspension culture a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type cultures.

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr),
1. The propagation of microorganisms on or in media of various kinds.
2. A mass of microorganisms on or in a medium.
3. The propagation of mammalian cells, that is, cell culture.
4. A set of beliefs, values, artistic, historical, and religious characteristics, and customs common to a community or nation.
Synonym(s): cultivation
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]

culture

/cul·ture/ (kul´cher)
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.cul´tural

cell culture  a growth of cells in vitro; although the cells proliferate they do not organize into tissue.
continuous flow culture  the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
hanging-drop culture  a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
plate culture  one grown on a medium, usually agar or gelatin, on a Petri dish.
primary culture  a cell or tissue culture started from material taken directly from an organism, as opposed to that from an explant from an organism.
pure culture  a culture of a single cell species, without presence of any contaminants.
slant culture  one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
stab culture  one in which the medium is inoculated by thrusting a needle deep into its substance.
streak culture  one in which the medium is inoculated by drawing an infected wire across it.
suspension culture  a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture  maintenance or growth of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture  a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type or standard cultures.

culture

(kŭl′chər)
n.
Biology
a. The growing of microorganisms, tissue cells, or other living matter in a specially prepared nutrient medium.
b. Such a growth or colony, as of bacteria.
tr.v. cul·tured, cul·turing, cul·tures
a. To grow (microorganisms or other living matter) in a specially prepared nutrient medium.
b. To use (a substance) as a medium for culture: culture milk.

culture

[kul′chər]
Etymology: L, colere, to cultivate
1 (in microbiology) a laboratory test involving the cultivation of microorganisms or cells in a special growth medium. See also medium.
2 (in psychology) a set of learned values, beliefs, customs, and behavior that is shared by a group of interacting individuals.

culture

Agriculture
The growth of comestibles.

Microbiology
adjective Pertaining to a culture—e.g., culture plate.
 
noun A general term for a propagation of microorganisms—e.g., bacteria, fungi, viruses—in/on a growth media, or specimen so cultured, and the medium—agar, broth, etc.—in which it is being grown, under controlled conditions.
 
verb To place a specimen—which may contain pathogenic microorganisms—in a growth medium, under conditions intended to optimise the proliferation of those pathogens.

Molecular biology
The growth of cells.

Sexology
A swinging term for a particular type of sexual fetish or “art”.

Social medicine
A way of life for a particular ethnic group, which may include a language of communication, customs (rites, rituals), religion, lifestyle, shared system of values, beliefs, morals and social norms (patterns of behaviour), which can include dress and diet.

Vox populi
The training, development and refinement of mind, tastes and manners; the condition of being thus trained and refined; the intellectual side of civilisation.

HIV test

Various tests have been used to detect HIV and production of antibodies thereto; some HTs shown below are no longer actively used, but are listed for completeness and context. See HIV, Immunoblot.
HIV tests
Culture The direct culture of HIV in the appropriate cell–human lymphocytes
IgA assay An immunoblot-type assay which allows the early diagnosis in infants of perinatal HIV infection
p24 antigen The measurement of HIV's p24 antigen by immunoassay, confirmation by neutralization; very low sensitivity
PCR Amplification of HIV nucleotide sequences by PCR, used to confirm indeterminate Western blot results
RNA testing
Western blot An immune assay which detects specific antibodies to HIV antigens, including p24–often the first antibody to appear; low-risk individuals with a persisting indeterminant Western blot at 3 months may be regarded as negative and require no further followup

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr)
1. The propagation of microorganisms on or in various media.
2. A mass of microorganisms on or in a medium.
3. The propagation of mammalian cells, i.e., cell culture.
See: cell culture
4. A set of beliefs, values, artistic, historical, and religious characteristics; customs common to a community or nation.
Synonym(s): cultivation.
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]

culture

See BACTERIAL CULTURE, TISSUE CULTURE.

Culture

A laboratory procedure in which a sample from a wound, the blood or other body fluid is taken from an infected person. The sample is placed in conditions under which bacteria can grow. If bacteria grow, identification tests are done to determine the bacteria species causing the infection.

culture

propagation of microorganisms on media, to establish the nature of the infecting organism and its sensitivity to antimicrobial drugs

culture,

n 1. language, values, customs, and aesthetics of an individual or a group of people; culture influences attitudes about health and health care.
2. growth of bacteria, fungi, or viruses on or in nutritive media in the laboratory.

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr)
Propagation of microorganisms on or in any media.
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]

culture,

n 1. the growth of microorganisms or other living cells on artificial media.
2. a set of learned values, beliefs, customs, and behavior that is shared by a group of interacting individuals.
culture, bacterial,
n the bacterial growth on or in an artificial medium. The medium used may be selective for a given type or genus of organism (e.g., tomato juice agar for lactobacilli).
culture, endodontic,
n the growth of microorganisms obtained from root canals or periapical tissues.
culture, endodontic medium,
n a type used for endodontic cultures.
culture medium,
n a type used for cultivating bacteria.

culture

1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.

anaerobic culture
one carried out in the absence of air.
continuous flow culture
the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
explant culture
a small piece of tissue such as trachea or gut maintained in culture.
hanging-drop culture
a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture
a cell or tissue culture started from material taken directly from an organism. Subsequent passages of cells are referred to as secondary cultures.
secondary culture
a subculture derived from a primary culture.
slant culture
one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted when the agar was solidifying to provide a greater surface area for growth.
stab culture
a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture
one in which the medium is inoculated by drawing an infected wire loop across it.
suspension culture
a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable liquid medium.
tissue culture
the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function. Used loosely to refer to monolayer cell cultures. See explant culture (above).
type culture
a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central reference collection of type or standard organisms.
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Boro's first SEVEN home fixtures have been moved from the culturally significant kick-off time for broadcast.
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For each the taxpayer had to follow a structured syllabus, complete extensive reading assignments and participate in planned tours of historically and culturally significant sites directly related to the course of study.
The actual excursion upon which Avey is embarked while her metamorphosis occurs, recalls other culturally significant journeys, which Avey must remember in order to restore her physical and emotional health.

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