Dipylidium caninum

(redirected from Cucumber tapeworm)
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Dip·y·lid·i·um ca·ni·num

(dip'i-lid'ē-ŭm kā-nī'nŭm),
The commonest species of dog tapeworm, the double-pored tapeworm, the larvae of which are harbored by dog fleas or lice; the worm occasionally infects humans, especially children licked by dogs that have recently nipped infected fleas.
[G. dipylos, with two entrances; L. ntr. of caninus, pertaining to canis, dog]

Dipylidium caninum

A dog and cat tapeworm which infects infants and children; it may be under-diagnosed, as motile egg-containing proglottids can be misinterpreted as pinworms or vegetable matter in a routine ova and parasite test in microbiology.

Dip·y·lid·i·um ca·ni·num

(dip-lid'ē-ŭm kā-nī'nŭm)
The most common species of dog tapeworm, the double-pored tapeworm, the larvae of which are harbored by dog fleas or lice; the worm occasionally infects humans.
[G. dipylos, with two entrances; L. ntr. of caninus, pertaining to canis, dog]

Dipylidium caninum

A short tapeworm of dogs and cats with the flea or louse as intermediate host. Children are occasionally infected when they swallow dog or cat fleas. Segments of the worm are seen in the stools.

Dipylidium

a genus of tapeworms of the family Dipylidiidae. Besides those listed below, includes D. gracile, D. compactum, D. diffusum, D. buencaminoi (syn. D. caninum), D. sexcoronatum (cats).

Dipylidium caninum
the dog tapeworm, parasitic in dogs and cats and occasionally found in humans. Esthetically unattractive when excreted in the feces, but causes little damage other than anal irritation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cat can carry the cucumber tapeworm, a parasite which can be transmitted to humans through direct contact with the cat or their droppings.