Cryptosporidium

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Related to Cryptosporidia: Cryptosporidium parvum

Cryptosporidium

 [krip″to-spo-rid´e-um]
a genus of minute coccidian protozoa; they are parasitic in the intestinal tracts of many different vertebrates, including reptiles, birds, and mammals. See also cryptosporidiosis.

Cryptosporidium

(krip'tō-spō-rid'ē-ŭm),
A genus of coccidian sporozoans (family Cryptosporiidae, suborder Eimeriina) that are important pathogens of calves and other domestic animals, and common opportunistic parasites of humans that flourish under conditions of compromised immune function; can cause self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent people.

Cryptosporidium

/Cryp·to·spo·ri·di·um/ (-spo-rid´e-um) a genus of parasitic protozoa found in the intestinal tracts of many different vertebrates and the etiologic agent of cryptosporidiosis in humans.

cryptosporidium

(krĭp′tō-spə-rĭd′ē-əm)
n.
A protozoan of the genus Cryptosporidium that is an intestinal parasite in humans and other vertebrates and sometimes causes diarrhea that is especially severe in immunocompromised people.

Cryp·to·spo·rid·i·um

(krip'tō-spō-rid'ē-ŭm)
A genus of coccidian sporozoans (family Cryptosporidiidae, suborder Eimeriina) that are important pathogens of calves and other domestic animals, and common opportunistic parasites of humans; they flourish under conditions of compromised immune function; can cause self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent people.

Cryptosporidium

A type of parasitic protozoa.
Mentioned in: Stool O & P Test

Cryptosporidium

a protozoan parasite in most species. A member of the family Eimeriidae. Includes C. bayleyi in birds, C. serpentis in reptiles, C. crotalis in reptiles, C. meleagridis in birds, and C. nasorum in fish. C. parvum infects many different hosts including cattle, swine, horses and small ruminants. C. parvum has two distinct genotypes known as human genotype 1 (also known as C. hominis) and bovine genotype 2. Both genotypes are capable of causing disease in humans. Livestock are not commonly infected with genotype 1. C. andersoni (C. muris) infects cattle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cryptosporidia in the cloacal coprodeum of red-lored parrots (Amazona autumnalis).
But the latest data - and feedback from vets in practice - suggest cryptosporidia incidence is on an upward trend.
A decade ago, rotavirus was the main problem in infectious scour and was discovered in around a third of cases while the cryptosporidia parasite was responsible for around a quarter.
Mr McGurren said: "But in 2009, we detected cryptosporidia in 30% of samples.
The major sources of cryptosporidia are believed to be either adult cows, which carry the infection without showing signs of disease, or other infected calves passing the parasite on in their faeces.
Differential staining of cryptosporidia by aniline-carbol-methyl violet and tartrazine in smears from faeces and scraping of intestinal mucosa.