cryptochrome

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cryp·to·chrome

(krip'tō-krōm),
Flavoprotein ultraviolet-A receptor involved in circadian rhythm entrainment in plants, insects, and mammals.

cryp·to·chrome

(krip'tō-krōm)
Flavoprotein ultraviolet-A receptor involved in circadian rhythm entrainment in plants, insects, and mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another question is that there is still no available structure for animal cryptochromes and no reports about the candidates proteins interact with cryptochrome in magnetoreception.
Light-dependent development of plants involve the combined action of several important photoreceptors including the red/far-red light-absorbing phytochromes (Quail, 1995), the blue/UV-A light absorbing cryptochromes (Ahmad and Cashmore, 1996), and distinct UV-A (Young et al.
Proteins called cryptochromes in the birds' eyes may mediate this light-dependent magnetic sensing, Mouritsen says.
If cryptochromes or other chemicals in a bird's eye behave as the new molecule does, they could provide the foundation of a bird's magnetic sense.
Indeed, the far more abundant blue photons in the treatment with the higher photosynthetic energy will be absorbed by cryptochromes, the blue photoreceptors present in plants which control stem elongation and leaf expansion.
IF you're feeling a little SAD, as in Seasonal Affective Disorder, it'll be your cryptochromes creating biochemical changes.
No, plants don't wear shades, but plant tissues do contain proteins called phytochromes and cryptochromes that "see" the intensity and amount of light.
More recently, scientists have found that our internal clocks use proteins in the eye called cryptochromes to adjust to local time.
Surexi[TM] LEDs are available in multiple wavelength combinations to allow consumers and researchers to precisely target the desired photoreceptors, such as phytochromes and cryptochromes.
Like, mice lacking a pair of molecules known as cryptochromes have an abnormal circadian rhythm.
In studying the cryptochromes, Reppert's team detected nightly rises of the mouselike one in the butterfly's neural connection between the brain's clock and the navigation center.
We can now look at things that are the same and different between human and mouse cryptochromes and plant photolyases.