Crutchfield tongs

Crutchfield tongs

Etymology: William G. Crutchfield, American neurosurgeon, 1900-1972; ME, tonges
an instrument that is attached to the skull to hyperextend the head and neck of patients with fractured cervical vertebrae for the purpose of immobilizing and aligning the vertebrae.
method The tips of the tongs are inserted into small burr holes drilled in each parietal region of the skull; the surrounding skin is sutured and covered with a collodion dressing. A rope tied to the center of the tongs passes over a pulley at the head of the bed and is attached to a weight of 10 to 20 pounds, which hangs freely.
outcome criteria A patient may be immobilized by Crutchfield tongs for weeks before surgery is performed. During an operation on the cervical spine and spinal cord, the tongs may be left in place for proper alignment.
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Crutchfield tongs

Crutch·field tongs

(krŭch'fēld tawngz)
Instrument to provide skull traction by immobilizing the cervical spine.

Crutchfield tongs

(krŭtch″fēld′)
[William Gayle Crutchfield, U.S. surgeon, 1900–1972]
A traction device whose pins are inserted into the skull to distract and/or immobilize the neck. Crutchfield tongs are used to stabilize fractures of the cervical spine.

Crutchfield,

William G., U.S. neurosurgeon, 1900–.
Crutchfield clamp
Crutchfield drill
Crutchfield operation
Crutchfield reduction technique
Crutchfield skeletal traction
Crutchfield skull-tip pin
Crutchfield tongs
Crutchfield tongs prosthesis
Crutchfield traction
Crutchfield traction bow
Crutchfield traction tongs