Crookes


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Crookes

(kruks),
William, British physicist and chemist, 1832-1919; winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1907. See: Crookes glass, Crookes-Hittorf tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
The local magistrate court gave a hearing that Crookes was later tracked down when the photograph was put in the local paper, with the report adding that although he denied assaulting the students, he was found guilty.
1) Newton's article contained both a shallow hyperlink which brought a web user to a homepage of a website called OpenPolitics, and a deep hyperlink which sent users directly to an article about Crookes on the website www.
Winger Crookes forced his way over for his second try after impressive young back rower John Bateman had been stopped just short.
Kearney made amends with a good run and, despite being caught by Josh Hodgson, Lulia's pass put Crookes over for his third try in the last four games.
Crookes new job will involve three topmost priorities and these will be (i) Provision for innovative products and services via thorough work with the three associate nations so that sustained economic development and poverty eradication is possible, (ii) direct and help the personnel and the squad for the country management, work closely with internal as well as external associates so that meaningful outcome becomes a reality and (iii) guide and assist team while executing the new Africa Strategy along with fine-tuning of the corporate facts and options.
Fellow marines told the inquest, held by Black Country coroner Robin Balmain, that the terrain in the Sangin district, where Marine Crookes and around 200 colleagues were based, was extremely treacherous with some hidden bombs almost impossible to detect amid the rubble of previous explosions.
The couple had not set a date for their wedding when Marine Crookes was killed in an explosion during a reassurance patrol in the Sangin district of Helmand province on July 16.
Loch Awe was different, said Mr Crookes, because of the lack of population and difficulty in communications.
Crookes, who has a long history of serious child sexual offences, then used a camcorder to take indecent pictures of at least one of the boys, who are all aged under 13.
99 for 30g and Crookes plans to welcome its arrival with a heavyweight 6m [pounds sterling] campaign that will include TV and print advertising and sampling.
Crookes discovered that the squid's reflectors are made of unique proteins (chains of amino acids) and are unlike any other known reflector.
This shadow would expose the animal to predators, says Crookes.