Crocodilia

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Crocodilia

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Unfortunately, although turtles and crocodilians occur there, they have not been detailed, although four species of fossil sea snakes (see Table 2) from the locality are well known (Parmley and Case 1988; Holman and Case 1992).
Crocodilians can't chew their food, so they swallow it whole
Since 1971, the Nile crocodile and six other crocodilians, including the American alligator and Australia's saltwater crocodile, have been downlisted from endangered status thanks in good part to protective measures and, to a lesser degree, carefully monitored ranching operations.
Although underreported, fruit eating appears widespread among crocodilians," study's lead author, Steven Platt of the Wildlife Conservation Society, said.
Gignac emphasizes that the study results suggest that once crocodilians evolved their remarkable capacity for force-generation, further adaptive modifications involved changes in body size and the dentition to modify forces and pressures for different diets.
To understand sauropod respiratory systems, scientists looked to the breathing and anatomy of birds and crocodilians.
A crocodilian is represented by a generalized, striated piercing tooth and a juvenile tooth.
Burghardt proposes that animals with complex and flexible behavior (which of course crocodilians show) play a lot even if people don't notice.
On account of the species' extremely different jaw shapes, the researchers are convinced that the different crocodilians were highly specialized feeders: With their pointed, slender snouts, the fossil gharials must have preyed on fish.
had small but numerous teeth, which suggest that the theropod might have eaten prey like lizards and small relatives of today's mammals and crocodilians.
acutus and other crocodilians, individuals #22 months old remain relatively near their nest site (Rodda, 1984; Ouboter and Nanhoe, 1988).