crassulacean acid metabolism

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crassulacean acid metabolism

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crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)

a method of PHOTOSYNTHESIS found in certain succulent plants (members of the family Crassulaceae) that live in hot, dry climates and close their stomata during the day to avoid excessive TRANSPIRATION losses and open them at night. During the night CO2 is taken in and stored as organic acids (e.g. malic acid); during the day the CO2 is released from the organic acids and used in the CALVIN CYCLE.
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Crassulacean acid metabolism is a physiological feature that increases the use of water and nutrients, such as crassulacean in leaves containing highly thickened and cutinized cell walls, and it is the main mechanism of survival of epiphytes (KERTEN; KUNIOSHI, 2009; SILVA et al.
1984, "Characterization of the vacuolar ATPase activity of the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana," Eur.
Variations in the phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism and regulation of carboxylation patterns determined by carbon-isotope-discrimination techniques.
Crassulacean acid metabolism--or CAM, as it is commonly known--is one of three recognized photosynthetic pathways.
According to the study titled "Tthe KalanchoAaAaAeAe1/2 genome provides insigh into convergent evolution and building blocks of crassulacean acid metabolism," crop production is the world's largest consumer of freshwater.
Nobel PS, Luttge U, Heuer S, Ball E (1984) Influence of applied NaCl on crassulacean acid metabolism and ionic levels in a cactus, Cereus validus.
In the late 1970s, a colleague who was studying metabolic tricks that plants use in harsh environments proposed to von Willert that Welwitschia can conserve water by a process called crassulacean acid metabolism, or CAM.
Crayn DM, Winter K, Smith JAC (2004) Multiple origins of crassulacean acid metabolism and the epiphytic habit in the Neotropical family Bromeliaceae.