Crandall


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Cran·dall

(kran'dăl),
Barbara F., 20th-century U.S. physician. See: Crandall syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to joining Attivo Networks, Crandall served in executive marketing and sales roles at Maxta, Inc.
Crandall has 30 years experience in the consulting field.
Only in her dreams does she find a constant beacon in the form of one June Crandall, an enigmatic protector who follows her dream world through war and cultural challenges.
Board Chairman Donald Crandall, who voted for Clark over the other companies, said if the project is achieved by December 2015, Clark's price would fall down to $346,000.
Crandall, the FPA Board recognizes his decades of high quality contributions to fusion research and development at the US Department of Energy in both the Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration in both the magnetic and inertial fusion programs.
He was born on February 5, 1920 in New Britain, CT the son of Beatrice and Charles Crandall.
In an interview with Bloomberg Surveillance, Crandall says he thinks the electrical issue with the 787 "obviously is a big and concerning problem for both the airlines and for Boeing.
Then one day in the fall of 1832, Miss Crandall admitted a new student.
Crandall joined American Airlines in 1973, becoming President in 1982, and Chairman and CEO in 1985.
Former American Airlines CEO Robert Crandall told a conference in London on Tuesday that the recent "cataclysmic events" in the world economy provide an opportunity for the airline industry to make much-needed changes.
This collection is based on the true story of Prudence Crandall and her fight to teach young ladies of color alongside her white female students.