cranberry

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cranberry

an herbal product whose berries are harvested from a small shrub found in the United States from Alaska to Tennessee.
uses It is used for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and works by decreasing bacterial adherence to the walls of the bladder, urethra, and so on. Although likely effective to some degree, patients should not rely on cranberry juice for treating UTIs.
contraindications Those with known hypersensitivity, oliguria, or anuria should not use cranberry.

cranberry

(krăn′bĕr-ē)
A tart red fruit, Vaccinium macrocarpon, commonly used in the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Evidence supporting cranberry as treatment of UTIs is limited. Whether drinking cranberry juice is as effective in preventing UTIs as chronic antibiotic use is unknown. Its mechanism of action is to decrease adherence of some bacteria to the urothelium.

cranberry,

n Latin names:
Vaccinium macrocarpon, Vaccinium oxycoccus, Vaccinium erythrocarpum; part used: berries; uses: kidney stones, prevention of urinary tract infections; precautions: patients with oliguria or anuria. Also called
bog cranberry, isokarpalo, marsh apple, mountain cranberry, and
pikkukarpalo.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cranberry Institute is funded voluntarily by Supporting Members that handle, process, and sell cranberries.
They worked out that people who consumed a lot of cranberries produced purer, odor free urine.
But that's not the only reason to toss a couple of bags of cranberries into your cart.
As a rich source of antioxidants, cranberries are being intensively studied for their anti-aging potential and as a means to improve cardiovascular health and the body's ability to fend off cancers.
The fruit's well-known health benefits extend to sweetened dried cranberries, which are high in fibre, rich in vitamin C and contain antioxidants that eradicate free radicals from the body.
In the 1840s German scientists researched the connection between cranberries and urinary tract infections (UTIs) after noting that urinary excretion of hippuric acid increased after ingestion of cranberries, which are bacteriostatic in high concentrations (Hutchinson 2005, Ulbricht 2005, Siciliano 1996).
Dr Amy Howell, a research scientist in nutraceuticals at Rutgers, the state university of New Jersey, has followed many research trails on cranberries triggered by Native American folklore.
Cranberries were an important staple among the indigenous peoples of North America long before the Europeans set foot on this continent.
Cranberries and their juices also may prevent certain bacteria that cause urinary tract infection from accumulating in the bladder; have a role in treating various stomach ulcers; lower levels of low-density lipoprotein, the "bad" cholesterol; and increase blood levels of salicylic acid, an anti-inflammatory compound similar to aspirin.
Because deeply pigmented berries also contain dozens of such compounds--several with suspected anticancer activity Guthrie recently turned to cranberries.
According to legend, Peg Leg John, a New Jersey farmer, was packing cranberries in his barn.