Coxiella burnetii


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Cox·i·el·la bur·ne·ti·i

a bacterial species that causes Q fever in humans; it is more resistant than other rickettsiae and may be passed in aerosols as well as in living vectors. Acute pneumonia and chronic endocarditis are also associated with this species. The type species of the genus Coxiella.

Coxiella burnetii

a gram-negative bacterium that grows preferentially in the vacuoles of the host cell and causes Q fever. It is distributed globally. Humans are very susceptible to infection, and the infectious dose may be very low. Also called Rickettsia burnetii.

Coxiella burnetii

Infectious disease The single species of genus Coxiella, family Rickettsiaceae, a short, rod-shaped bacterium; it is global in distribution, causes Q fever, spreads by aerosol, primarily infects cattle, sheep, goats, multiplies well in the placenta, and is shed during parturition. See Q fever.

Cox·i·el·la bur·ne·ti·i

(kok-sē-el'ă bŭr-nē'shē-ī)
A species that causes Q fever in humans. It is more resistant than other rickettsiae and may be passed in aerosols as well as living vectors. Acute pneumonia and chronic endocarditis are also associated with this species. The type species of the genus Coxiella.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coxiella burnetii IFA Kit, sufficient for 2000 tests.
An environmental study determined that Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever--a bacterial infection that can affect the lungs, liver, heart, and other parts of the body--is fairly common in the United States, suggesting that exposure to the bacterium may be more frequent than what is suggested by the number of reported cases--fewer than 200 annually.
UK scientists from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) and Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) reported this week at the University of Southampton's Wessex Life Sciences Alliance Conference the successful testing of Aradigm's inhaled liposomal ciprofloxacin against Coxiella burnetii in a mouse model of this virulent infection.
Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Q fever, a zoonosis occurring worldwide (1).
13 Composition and Structure of Lipid A of the Intracellular Bacteria Piscirickettsia salmonis and Coxiella burnetii
Coxiella burnetii, which is the cause of Q fever, is a zoonotic pathogen that infects multiple hosts (3).
The list of potential microorganisms has been expanded and procedures have been written for such agents as Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), Clostridium botulinum, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Brucella and staphylococcal toxins.
Food and Drug Administration cleared the first nucleic acid amplification In vitro diagnostic (IVD) test that detects Coxiella burnetii, the bacteria that causes Q fever.
coli (13 [17%]), Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (2 [3%]), and Coxiella burnetii (1[1%]) (Figure 1).
Burkbolderia mallei, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, Coxiella burnetii, Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE), viral hemorrhagic fevers, smallpox, botulinum toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, and T-2 toxins.
The final regulation reflects a determination of a positive association between service in Southwest Asia or Afghanistan and nine diseases and includes information about the long-term health effects potentially associated with these diseases: Brucellosis, Campylobacter jejuni, Coxiella Burnetii (Q fever), Malaria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Nontyphoid Salmonella, Shigella, Visceral leishmaniasis and West Nile virus.