Cox proportional hazard model

Cox proportional hazard model

(koks),
a statistical model used in survival analysis to demonstrate the multiplicative effect of several designated study factors, showing that this effect does not change over time. It was invented by the British statistician D. R. Cox.
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Coefficient estimators for the final model using all patients in a Cox proportional hazard model * Parameter Parameter Standard P estimate error value Age group (80-84) -0.
Selected variables in univariate analysis were entered in a stepwise multivariate Cox proportional hazard model to determine independent contributions of predictors for the primary endpoint.
0001 nonfatal MI (a) Standardized HRs for log(suPAR) for all-cause mortality, HF, and fatal or nonfatal Ml In a Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for age and sex (multivariate model 1) from 6 months until 5 years of follow-up.
Researchers used log-rank tests and Gray's test to identify differences among study groups, and the Cox proportional hazard model to estimate hazard ratios for HIV transmission.
In this paper, we investigated and we quantified the relationship between hospital costs and health outcomes for patients with AMI using a two-step random intercept Cox proportional hazard model to obtain consistent estimates of the effects of costs on outcomes.
To empirically analyze this relationship, the duration of the KCHIP 3 enrollment spells described earlier is estimated using a Cox proportional hazard model with time-varying covariates to model the yearly recertification process and introduction of the premium.
The Cox proportional hazard model examined racial differences in recidivism risks controlling for the two covariates.
The researchers used a Cox proportional hazard model to assess the risk of developing incident heart failure, adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, and stage of chronic kidney disease based on ICD-9 codes 585.
Cox proportional hazard model is used to examine the relationship between survival and covariates.
To the best of our knowledge, this present study is the first to use the Cox proportional hazard model to analyze the determinants of successful graduation at high school, depending on the age of adolescents.
We use these variables to estimate a semi-parametric Cox proportional hazard model.