psychology

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psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.

psy·chol·o·gy

(sī-kol'ŏ-jē),
The profession (for example, clinical psychology), scholarly discipline (academic psychology), and science (research psychology) concerned with the behavior of humans and animals, and related mental and physiologic processes.
[psycho- + G. logos, study]

psychology

/psy·chol·o·gy/ (si-kol´ah-je) the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior.psycholog´icpsycholog´ical
analytic psychology  psychology based on the concept of the collective unconscious and the complex.
child psychology  the study of the development of the mind of the child.
clinical psychology  the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology  a broad term referring to the organization of community resources for the prevention of mental disorders.
criminal psychology  the study of the mentality, motivation, and social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology  psychoanalysis.
developmental psychology  the study of behavioral change through the life span.
dynamic psychology  that stressing the element of energy in mental processes.
environmental psychology  the study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology  the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
gestalt psychology  gestaltism.
physiologic psychology , physiological psychology the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology  that treating of the social aspects of mental life.

psychology

(sī-kŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. psycholo·gies
1. The science that deals with mental processes and behavior.
2. The emotional and behavioral characteristics of an individual, group, or activity: the psychology of war.
3. Subtle tactical action or argument used to manipulate or influence another: He used poor psychology on his employer when trying to make the point.
4. Philosophy The branch of metaphysics that studies the soul, the mind, and the relationship of life and mind to the functions of the body.

psychology (psych)

[sīkol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + logos, science
1 the study of behavior and of the functions and processes of the mind, especially as related to the social and physical environment.
2 a profession that involves the practical applications of knowledge, skills, and techniques in the understanding of, prevention of, or solution to individual or social problems, especially in regard to the interaction between the individual and the physical and social environment.
3 the mental, motivational, and behavioral characteristics and attitudes of an individual or group of individuals. Kinds of psychology include analytic psychology, animal psychology, behaviorism, clinical psychology, cognitive psychology, educational psychology, experimental psychology, humanistic psychology, phenomenology, and social psychology. psychologic, psychological, adj.

psychology

Psychiatry The discipline concerned with behavioral, mental and emotional processes, especially vis-á-vis human behavior. See Analytical psychology, Archetypal psychology, Clinical psychology, Depth psychology, Developmental psychology, Ego psychology, Evolutionary psychology, Gestalt psychology, Humanistic psychology, Individual psychology, Parapsychology, Process psychology, Psychological, Psychotherapy, Reverse psychology, Spiritual psychology, Transpersonal psychology.

psy·chol·o·gy

(sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
Study of the behavior of humans and animals, and related mental and physiologic processes.
[psycho- + G. logos, study]

psychology

The scientific study of behaviour and its related mental processes. Psychology is concerned with such matters as memory, rational and irrational thought, intelligence, learning, personality, perceptions and emotions and their relationship to behaviour.

psy·chol·o·gy

(sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
The profession (e.g., clinical psychology), scholarly discipline (academic psychology), and science (research psychology) concerned with the behavior of humans and animals, and related mental and physiologic processes.
[psycho- + G. logos, study]

psychology (sīkol´əjē),

n 1. the study of behavior and the functions and processes of the mind, especially as related to the social and physical environment.
n 2. a profession that involves the practical applications of knowledge, skills, and techniques in the understanding of, prevention of, or solution to individual or social problems, especially in regard to the interaction between the individual and the physical and social environment.

Patient discussion about psychology

Q. What is better- psychological help or medicinal? What treatment strategy should I choose to help me in depression?

A. I doubt the answer to this question has a generic answer for everyone and there's no way someone like myself could answer it for your paricular situation. Its something for medical professionals to determine. Start with your medical doctor. Doctors know most of the other doctors in your vicinity and make recomendations to see others if appropriate. It could be simple with some form of medication or could be counseling or both. Its worth every penny spent consulting your doctor to find out. You may have problems with stress or anxiety as well.

Q. Could be I’ve been having an anxiety attack? My husband is deployed right now; he's been gone for about 2.5 months. I was fine at first, but lately I have started having anxiety. At least I think that's what it is, I've never experienced this before. I get these nagging worries in my mind that just won't quit, and then I start to feel it all over my body like an aching... its difficult to describe. Anyway, I feel like I want to go to my doctor about this, but I am afraid he will see me as just someone trying to get a pill for something. But It also affecting my sleep and my well-being. What should I do? Are there any natural remedies for anxiety that I could try?

A. You can get over it, but you’ll need support. Talk with a friend of yours, pick a “not hysteric one” and tell her about it. If you know other women of other soldiers in his platoon- talk with them and they’ll understand you. Most of the time it’s just a phase and it’ll pass away. Got to a massage with a friend, shopping, anything fun. Talk with your husband and let him calm you down. If all this doesn’t work- talk to your Dr. and I’m sure he’ll understand.

More discussions about psychology
References in periodicals archive ?
The five largest psychotherapy-providing occupations are psychiatrist, clinical and counseling psychologists, clinical social worker, marriage and family therapist, and clinical mental health counselor.
Family of origin and career development was the topic of interest in the July issue of the Counseling Psychologist (Vol.
Similarly, a group of articles in The Counseling Psychologist addressed how research, theory, and practice can inform training.
Of particular importance in this area was a major contribution in The Counseling Psychologist that focused on the interface between relationships and work.
The article profiles the "30 Most Influential Counseling Psychologists Alive Today," and is aimed at college students who are researching careers in the field.
As counseling psychologists, we have learned the importance of listening to others and trying to understand their perspectives.
On any given Tuesday morning, a massive gathering of rehabilitation nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, recreation therapists, neurophysiologists, counseling psychologists, case managers, social workers, dieticians, researchers and chaplains gather under fluorescent lights in a room at the Palo Alto Polytrauma Center.
In addition, or in opposition, to employing empirical and deductive methods, some - especially clinical and counseling psychologists - at times rely upon symbolic interpretation and other inductive techniques.
Greater emphasis is also being placed on counseling psychologists about accepted practices.
Rhodes, a clinical psychologist who works with clients with psychoses, long-term mood disorders, and traumas, describes how narrative ideas and practices can be combined with aspects of cognitive behavioral therapy for use by clinical and counseling psychologists, psychotherapists, and other mental health professionals.
However, the more articles and books he read by prominent counseling psychologists like Dr.
Stating that psychologists who do not take into account America's increasing ethnic and racial diversity may find themselves unemployed or at least not meeting ethical imperatives, educational and counseling psychologists Fouad ( U.

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