Coulomb's law


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Coulomb's law

Etymology: Charles A. de Coulomb
(in physics) a law stating that the force of attraction or repulsion between two electrically charged bodies is directly proportional to the strength of the electrical charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Coulomb's law of friction can be used to define the resistive force between two involute spur gear teeth:
It is well known that mass and electric charge are two fundamental properties (inertia and electricity) of matter, which directly determine the gravitational and electromagnetic interactions via Newton's law of gravity [1] and Coulomb's law of electric force [2].
First, the actual Law of Attraction, called Coulomb's Law after the eighteenth-century physicist C.
The tectonic stress measured by hydraulic fracturing method in borehole is introduced into the calculation of critical pore-pressure for frictional shear slip of fractures according to Coulomb's law.