cotton

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cotton

 [kot´'n]
1. a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2. a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
absorbable cotton oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton (purified cotton) cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

Cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
Frank A., 20th-century U.S. chemist. See: Cotton effect.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn),
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium (family Malvaceae); used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qútun]

cotton

/cot·ton/ (kot´'n) a plant of the genus Gossypium, or a textile material derived from its seeds.
absorbable cotton  oxidized cellulose.
absorbent cotton , purified cotton cotton freed from impurities, bleached, and sterilized; used as a surgical dressing.

cotton

[kot′n]
1 a plant of the genus Gossypium.
2 a textile material derived from the seeds of this plant.
Drug slang noun A regional term for cash
Imaging adjective Referring to a pattern of wispy radiopacification

gos·sy·pol

(gos'i-pol)
(Gossypium hirsutum) This plant's parts are thought to be of value as a male contraceptive (clinical studies done); other uses are as an antineoplastic and vaginal spermicide. Adverse effects reported include heart failure, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and, with oral ingestion of seeds, death by poisoning.
Synonym(s): cotton.
[gossypium, + -ol]

cotton,

n Latin name:
Gossypium herbaceum; parts used: bark, seeds, leaves, flowers, root bark; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata dosha (sweet, astringent, light, oily), antifertility, antibacterial, antiviral, antimutagen, antitumor, emmenagogue, expectorant, amenorrhea, dysentery, (seeds) rheumatism, (leaves) diuretic; precautions: none known. Also called
kapas or
tundakesi.
Enlarge picture
Cotton.

cot·ton

(kot'ŏn)
The white, fluffy, fibrous covering of the seeds of a plant of the genus Gossypium; used extensively in surgical dressings.
[Ar. qùtun]

cotton

see suture (3, 4), gossypium.

cotton bush (commercial cotton)
plant Gossypium spp. in the family Malvaceae; seeds contain gossypol, a toxic phenol which causes cardiomyopathy, hepatopathy and edema in all organs.
cotton seed meal
meal or cake residue after extrusion of oil; used as livestock feed but toxic because of presence of gossypol.
cotton test
a test of vision in animals; a piece of cotton is dropped within the field of vision. A dog or cat with normal vision will follow the cotton as it descends.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lower SG for samples with higher quantity of CGW is expected as cotton linters are lighter in weight compared to wood flour.
05 per share) in restructuring and impairment expenses related to the announced closure of the Glueckstadt, Germany cotton linter pulp plant.
This alliance will enable Buckeye to offer its customers a broader range of specialty productions and make it the only company in the world offering a full range of specialty pulps including kraft and sulphite wood pulps as well as cotton linter pulp.
NYSE:BKI) today announced that it will discontinue producing cotton linter pulp at its Glueckstadt, Germany facility in the fourth quarter of calendar year 2005.
Buckeye will be the only company in the world marketing the full range of specialty pulps - kraft and sulphite wood pulps as well as cotton linter pulp.
During the past two months we have made progress in improving our cotton linter raw material supply position and have raised cotton cellulose prices to reflect the increased costs involved.
Cannon commented "The shortage of cotton linter raw material and related cost increases occurred after many finished product prices were established for the current quarter.
McAllister vice president, cotton linter pulp, reporting to D.
Milling wheat, portland, polypropylene bags, preforms, raw cotton, cotton linters, bale packaging waste, etc.
Based on a natural polymer, AkzoNobel 's Bermocoll cellulose derivatives are sourced from wood pulp or cotton linters.
Viscose fiber is a type of artificial cellulose fiber made of such raw materials as wood, bamboo and cotton linters, mainly used in the textile industry.
They will also examine current and future changes in the supply mix, both for specialty wood pulp and cotton linters pulp, which compete for the same cellulose basket.