cost-benefit ratio

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cost-benefit ratio

a mathematic representation of the relationship of the cost of an activity to the benefit of its outcome or product.
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Among the Clariant products used by Anglo American, FLOTIGAM 7500 is a new collector agent surpassing existing technologies that delivers industry leading cost-benefit ratios when concentrating iron ore within the market specifications.
The immense cost and training implications of such a policy would have to be weighed against the cost-benefit ratios of other interventions, like education, condom usage, and HPV vaccination.
overlooked, and improve the cost-benefit ratios of their products.
The book explores in detail the psychology of risk assessment and management at the individual and social levels, and the specific preparatory activities that are modulated by people's interpretation of risk and cost-benefit ratios.
Clinical protocols could be established by which just those drugs with the best cost-benefit ratio would be reimbursed as the first step in treatment, and reimbursement for other drugs with less favorable cost-benefit ratios would only occur upon failure or intolerance of first-choice ones.
Gains in market value will also benefit from trends favoring higher performing fluoropolymer resins as end-users seek better cost-benefit ratios.
The cost-benefit ratios have been moving out over the past two-and-a-half years since Labour announced this project.
I saw Tony Blair on six occasions and each time he sanctioned the project, but we always came up against Treasury Ministers and their cost-benefit ratios.
This natural consequence of years of zero-sum budgeting and maximization of cost-benefit ratios is not surprising.
We analyzed strategies for the use of stockpiled antiviral drugs in the context of a future influenza pandemic and estimated cost-benefit ratios.
The investigators plan to analyze the data further to obtain cost-benefit ratios.
One possible structure to identify and connect career counseling's potential contributions to public policy is the creation of matrices or taxonomies that depict the large range of career concerns expressed by persons of different ages, at different transition stages, and in different conditions of employment, unemployment and underemployment; the differential treatments that research has shown to be effective in alleviating such career concerns under particular conditions; and the cost-benefit ratios associated with specific career problems and the treatment of them.