cosmid

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cos·mid

(koz'mid),
A recombinantly engineered plasmid, a circular DNA containing, in order: a plasmid origin of replication and a drug-resistance marker, the cos (cohesive end) site from bacteriophage λ, and a fragment of eukaryotic DNA to be cloned; cosmids are constructed to permit cloning of fragments of up to about 40,000 base pairs in length, with one or more unique restriction sites being necessary to facilitate cloning.

cosmid

(kŏz′mĭd)
n. Genetics
An artificially constructed plasmid used for cloning large genes or other DNA sequences.

cosmid

a class of CLONING VECTOR which comprises a bacterial PLASMID and the COS SITE of a BACTERIOPHAGE, typically bacteriophage lambda. A cosmid combines features of plasmids and of bacteriophages and can be used in CLONING. Large DNA fragments, up to 40 KILOBASE pairs in size, can be cloned in cosmids. The cosmid can be propagated as a plasmid in vivo and packaged into bacteriophages in vitro.

cosmid

a class of plasmid-based vectors carrying the bacteriophage λ cos sequences required for packaging of DNA into phage particles. Used for cloning large DNA fragments (up to 45 kilobases). Recombinant molecules constructed using cosmids are incorporated into bacteriophage using in vitro packaging extracts and introduced with high efficiency into Escherichia coli.
References in periodicals archive ?
The distinction between domain-specific and domain-general mental abilities was pioneered by John Tooby and Leda Cosmides and others.
Three sources of particular interest to economists would be Tooby and Cosmides' introductory essay in Buss (2005), Cosmides and Tooby (1994), and the contributions in Vol.
demonstrated, for instance, by Kurzban, Tooby, and Cosmides (2001)--it
In the past evolutionary psychology tended to focus more on common species traits and ignore individual differences (Tooby & Cosmides, 1992), while behaviorists tended to reduce individual differences to differences in reinforcement history.
Evolutionarily, the human eye was not selected for per se, but rather the gradual developments of the eye, however, were (Tooby and Cosmides 1992).
For EP see Jerome H Barkow, Leda Cosmides and John Tooby (eds), The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1992.
Evidence from a variety of perspectives (developmental psychology, evolutionary psychology, neurobiology, and cognitive psychology) indicate that the human brain is more like a "Swiss army knife" (Tooby & Cosmides, 1992) than an all purpose, context independent thinking system.
Tooby and Cosmides (1992) describe a modular architecture capable of generating new information about the subtle kinds of issues related to social interaction, by combining together from disparate pieces of nonpurposive data both consciously and unconsciously collected by the hunter-gatherer over the course of time.
Most controversial is the work of evolutionary psychologists such as Steven Pinker and Leda Cosmides who argue that evolution has produced a human brain with separate cognitive capacities specifically oriented to particular functions.
Women's early-30s peak in sexual desire might lend itself to evolutionary explanation, if it is linked to increased reproduction and to solving specific adaptive problems from our ancestral past (Lancaster, 1994; Tooby & Cosmides, 1992).
Ridley's (1997) The Origins of Virtue provides the extreme case but, in a similar way, the evolutionary psychologists Cosmides and Tooby (1992) appear to equate all social exchange with reciprocal altruism and, thereby, prioritize Prisoner's Dilemma as an analytical tool.
Studies with the Wason Selection Task, 31 COGNITION 187 (1989); Leda Cosmides & John Tooby, Cognitive Adaptations for Social Exchange, in THE ADAPTED MINI): EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY AND THE GENERATION OF CULTURE 163 (Jerome H.