Coronary arteries


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Related to Coronary arteries: coronary artery disease, Coronary circulation

coronary

 [kor´ah-nar-e]
encircling in the manner of a crown; said of anatomical structures such as vessels, ligaments, or nerves.
coronary arteries two large arteries that branch from the ascending aorta and supply all of the heart muscle with blood (see also table of arteries).
 A view of the coronary arterial system. The arteries serving the posterior aspect of the myocardium are shown here in a lighter shade.
coronary artery disease (CAD) atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, which may cause angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Both genetically determined and avoidable risk factors contribute to the disease; they include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and low levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL).
coronary heart disease (CHD) ischemic heart disease.
coronary occlusion the occlusion, or closing off, of a coronary artery, usually caused by a narrowing of the lumen of the blood vessels by the plaques of atherosclerosis. Sometimes a plaque may rupture and release vasoactive or thrombogenic substances that lead to clot formation. If there is adequate collateral circulation to the heart muscle at the time of the occlusion, there may be little or no damage to the myocardial cells. When occlusion is complete, however, with no blood being supplied to an area of the myocardium, myocardial infarction results.

cor·o·nar·y ar·te·ries

(kōr'ŏ-nār-ē ahr'tĕr-ēz)
A pair of arteries that branch from the aorta and supply blood to the myocardium. 1) Right coronary artery: origin, right aortic sinus; distribution, it passes around the right side of the heart in the coronary sulcus, giving branches to the right atrium and ventricle, including the atrioventricular branches and the posterior interventricular branch. 2) Left coronary artery: origin, left aortic sinus; distribution, divides into two major branches, anterior interventricular, which descends in anterior interventricular sulcus, and circumflex branch which passes to the diaphragmatic surface of left ventricle; it gives atrial, ventricular, and atrioventricular branches.

coronary arteries

Two important branches of the AORTA that supply the heart muscle with blood. The left coronary artery divides almost at once into two main trunks, so it is common for surgeons to refer to the three coronary arteries. Smaller branches of the coronary arteries spread over the surface of the heart and send twigs into the heart muscle. Obstruction of a coronary artery branch, by ATHEROSCLEROSIS and subsequent THROMBOSIS, is commoner than blockage of one of the main trunks. Such obstruction causes a heart attack by depriving a part of the heart muscle of its blood supply to cause local death of muscle tissue (myocardial infarction).

Coronary arteries

The two main arteries that provide blood to the heart. The coronary arteries surround the heart like a crown, coming out of the aorta, arching down over the top of the heart, and dividing into two branches. These are the arteries where coronary artery disease occurs.

coronary

encircling in the manner of a crown.
1. a term applied to vessels, ligaments, nerves, the band at the skin-hoof junction.
2. blood vessels partially encircling the heart.

coronary arteries
two large arteries that branch from the ascending aorta and supply all of the heart muscle with blood. See also Table 9.
coronary artery anomaly
one or both arteries originate from the pulmonary artery instead of the aorta; anoxia of the myocardium leads to congestive heart failure.
coronary artery laceration
in foals during a difficult parturition and in cattle due to penetration by a reticular foreign body; sudden death due to cardiac tamponade.
coronary artery rupture
can result from perforation by a foreign body from the reticulum as part of the syndrome of traumatic reticular pericarditis. Cardiac tamponade results, causing acute or congestive heart failure.
coronary band
the junction of the skin and the horn of the hoof.
coronary chemoreflex
intravenous injection of chemicals such as veratridine causes cardiac slowing, hypotension and apnea due to reflex response by the myocardium. Called also Bezold-Jarisch reflex.
coronary cushion
the spongy, resilient hypodermis beneath the coronary corium of the hoof.
coronary emboli
lodgment of an embolus in a coronary artery is a rare occurrence in animals. Myocardial ischemia and asthenia result, the effect on the animal varying with the amount of muscle compromised.
coronary occlusion
the occlusion, or closing off, of a coronary artery. The occlusion may result from formation of a clot (thrombosis). Narrowing of the lumen of the blood vessels by the plaques of atherosclerosis, as occurs in humans, does not occur in animals. If there is adequate collateral circulation to the heart muscle at the time of the occlusion, there may be little or no damage to the myocardial cells. When occlusion is complete, however, with no blood being supplied to an area of the myocardium, myocardial infarction results.
coronary perfusion pressure
the difference between aortic diastolic and right atrial diastolic pressure; a determinant of the blood flow to cardiac muscle.
coronary thrombosis
formation of a clot in a coronary artery. See also myocardial infarction.

Patient discussion about Coronary arteries

Q. my mother have stem replacement for a coronary artery oclusion is already 2 years she physically deteriorating since surgery why???? please help she does not have energy

A. I agree with Dagmar. It can be most likely caused by another occlusion or re-occlusion inside the heart blood vessels. Since that is a life-threatening case, I strongly suggest you to bring your mother into a hospital (for complete check up), or just call your cardiologist to have first treatment.

Meanwhile, that will be better if you have emergency oxygen (just in case you'll need it) with you.

More discussions about Coronary arteries
References in periodicals archive ?
The clinical data is strong, and clearly supports the use of Guidant's GALILEO System for treating blockages in coronary arteries," said Manel Sabate, M.
pneumoniae acquires the ability to colonize coronary arteries.
The Company's AngioJet System is the world's leading mechanical thrombectomy system with FDA approval to remove large and small thrombus from coronary arteries, coronary bypass grafts, peripheral arteries and veins and A-V grafts and native fistulas.
People with disease-narrowed coronary arteries experience repeated bouts of myocardial ischemia, a dangerous decline in the volume of blood flowing to heart muscle.
One of the biggest problems facing heart transplant patients is the threat of severe and rapidly forming plaque, which can clog the new coronary arteries and cause a heart attack, Melnick notes.
Finally, tests indicated that the women suffered from coronary spasms, which occur when the smooth muscle of the coronary arteries suddenly contracts, constricting the heart's blood supply.
The results indicate high quantitative and qualitative diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice multislice CT in a broad spectrum of patients, also including those patients who are obese and/or have heavily calcified coronary arteries.
King quickly points out that body surface area, calculated from height and weight, may not correlate with the size of coronary arteries.
Estradiol, an approved and safe drug used in hormone replacement therapy and other indications, represents a novel and potentially safer approach to reducing restenosis in human coronary arteries.

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