coronary heart disease

(redirected from Coronary Disease)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Coronary Disease: coronary artery disease, coronary heart disease

coronary

 [kor´ah-nar-e]
encircling in the manner of a crown; said of anatomical structures such as vessels, ligaments, or nerves.
coronary arteries two large arteries that branch from the ascending aorta and supply all of the heart muscle with blood (see also table of arteries).
 A view of the coronary arterial system. The arteries serving the posterior aspect of the myocardium are shown here in a lighter shade.
coronary artery disease (CAD) atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, which may cause angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Both genetically determined and avoidable risk factors contribute to the disease; they include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and low levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL).
coronary heart disease (CHD) ischemic heart disease.
coronary occlusion the occlusion, or closing off, of a coronary artery, usually caused by a narrowing of the lumen of the blood vessels by the plaques of atherosclerosis. Sometimes a plaque may rupture and release vasoactive or thrombogenic substances that lead to clot formation. If there is adequate collateral circulation to the heart muscle at the time of the occlusion, there may be little or no damage to the myocardial cells. When occlusion is complete, however, with no blood being supplied to an area of the myocardium, myocardial infarction results.

coronary heart disease

coronary heart disease

A general term for any disease affecting the coronary arteries, in particular atherosclerosis.

Risk factors
Hypertension, smoking and high cholesterol.

Management
Lifestyle and related medical therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The event rate was 9% among those who started with no diabetes or coronary disease, 10% among those with diabetes only, 24% among those with coronary disease only, and 40% among patients with both diabetes and coronary disease at baseline.
Among the 234 women without significant coronary disease, the sestamibi tests produced 15 false positives, for a specificity of 94%, compared with 2 false positives--specificity of 99%--from the ultrasound images.
For now, postmenopausal women with known coronary disease are better advised not to start HRT; if they've taken it for more than 2 years without ill effect, they may continue, she said.
Researchers said that people used to think that if someone had coronary disease, they would eventually have a heart attack.
Bainey's passion for heart health in this population group started when he first became a cardiologist and found out that South Asians - immigrants or their descendants from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bangladesh - who have coronary disease typically present at a younger age, live with more severe disease and have a higher mortality.
The researchers performed several other analyses of mortality rates during follow-up to assess the interaction of mortality risk and PTSD across the spectrum of coronary disease.
We and others have previously described the utilization of 64-slice cardiac CT to effectively rule out coronary disease in low-probability patients scheduled for cardiac operations, including removal of an intracardiac tumor, closure of a ventricular septal defect, and valve repair or replacement (1-4).
Unlike earlier studies, it looked not just at deaths, but also at heart attacks, coronary disease, strokes and clogged arteries.
Sufficient data were available for 80 of the women with no history of coronary disease to allow risk stratification based on National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines.
A People with diabetes sometimes have diffuse coronary disease, or plaques that run throughout the arteries, which make their arteries look "small" when they are really normal in size, just plugged more.
Studies have shown that two tablespoons a day of plant extract margarine (look for Benecol and Take Control) can reduce low-density lipoprotein levels (the bad cholesterol) by 10%, which is why the broader claim, that these foods can reduce your risk of coronary disease, is now being permitted.