pannus

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Related to Corneal neovascularization: corneal vascularization

pannus

 [pan´us]
1. superficial vascularization of the cornea with infiltration of granulation tissue.
2. an inflammatory exudate overlying synovial cells on the inside of a joint capsule, usually occurring in rheumatoid arthritis or related articular rheumatism.
3. panniculus adiposus.
Schematic presentation of the pathologic changes in rheumatoid arthritis. The inflammation (synovitis) leads to pannus formation, obliteration of the articular space. From Damjanov, 2000.

pan·nus

, pl.

pan·ni

(pan'ŭs, pan'ī), A membrane of granulation tissue covering a normal surface:
1. The inflammatory synovial tissue found in rheumatoid joints that covers the articular cartilages that progressively destroys the underlying articular cartilages; also found in other chronic granulomatous disease, including tuberculosis.
See also: corneal pannus.
2. The cornea in trachoma.
See also: corneal pannus.
[L. cloth]

pannus

/pan·nus/ (pan´us) [L.]
1. superficial vascularization of the cornea with infiltration of granulation tissue.
2. an inflammatory exudate overlying the synovial cells on the inside of a joint.

pannus trachomato´sus  pannus of the cornea secondary to trachoma.

pannus

[pan′əs]
Etymology: L, cloth
an abnormal condition of the cornea, which becomes vascularized and infiltrated with granular tissue just beneath the surface. Pannus may develop in the inflammatory stage of trachoma or after a detached retina, glaucoma, iridocyclitis, or other degenerative eye disorder.

pannus

A reticulated membrane of granulation (reactive fibrovascular) tissue, which is typical of the chronic proliferodestructive phase of rheumatoid arthritis; immune complexes form at synovial membranes, evoking a nonspecific immune response by macrophages, resulting in global destruction of chondroosseous tissue.

pannus

Rheumatology A reticulated membrane of granulation–reactive fibrovascular tissue typical of the chronic proliferodestructive phase of rheumatoid arthritis; immune complexes form at synovial membranes, evoking a nonspecific response, resulting in global destruction of chondroosseous tissue

pan·nus

, pl. panni (pan'ŭs, -ī)
1. A membrane of granulation tissue covering a normal surface.
2. The articular cartilages in rheumatoid arthritis and in chronic granulomatous diseases such as tuberculosis.
3. The cornea in trachoma.
See also: corneal pannus
[L. cloth]

pannus

A membrane of fine blood vessels and fibrous tissue that spreads down over the cornea in TRACHOMA and other inflammatory corneal disorders causing loss of vision. A similar membrane can affect the inner linings of joints.

pannus

chronic inflammatory hyperplasia of synovial membrane of joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis; characterized by granulation tissue (infiltrated by inflammatory cells and releasing lytic enzymes) that intrudes into the affected joint space, eroding bone margins and articular cartilage

pannus 

Abnormal superficial vascularization of the cornea covering the upper half, or sometimes the entire cornea. It is characterized by a thick plexus of vessels. It is found in some cases of contact lens wear, mainly soft lenses. Pannus following contact lens wear is referred to as corneal vascularization. If induced by soft lenses, it can be reduced by changing to lenses of high oxygen transmissibility or ceasing contact lens wear. Deep corneal vascularization involving the stroma is usually the result of a disease process (e.g. interstitial keratitis, phlyctenular keratitis, severe long-standing trichiasis, trachoma).

pannus

1. superficial vascularization of the cornea with infiltration of granulation tissue.
2. an inflammatory exudate overlying synovial cells on the inside of a joint capsule, usually occurring in rheumatoid arthritis or related articular rheumatism.
3. panniculus adiposus.

degenerative pannus
see chronic superficial keratitis.
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