cob

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COB

Abbreviation for Coordination of Benefits.

cob

1. a short-legged, thickset, strong type of horse, usually 13.2 to 14.2 hands high but not more than 15.2. Useful as a light cart horse or for riding as a means of transportation and for heavyweight riders wanting a steady rather than a flashy ride. Produced by mating polo pony stallions to carriage or light draft horses.
2. the central stem of a cob of corn (3); common as a cause of esophageal and intestinal obstruction in dogs.
3. male swan.
References in periodicals archive ?
Agricultural Research Service soil scientist Brian Wienhold focused on a single component of residue--the corncob.
That plant is beginning to gasify corncobs and other biomass to replace some of the natural gas used in producing ethanol.
A partnership of DuPont Danisco Celllulosic Ethanol (DDCE) and the University of Tennessee (UT), the 74,000-square-foot plant has already started producing ethanol from corncobs and switchgrass.
30 up to the "Harvest Festival" of hickory-smoked wings, onion rings, corncobs, potato skins and dips ( serving two) at pounds 5.
With a smooth and simple twist and push, the Corn Twister begins to strip the kernels off fresh or cooked corncobs with its razor sharp stainless steel serrated edge and scraping rivets.
The facility, to be built in Niles Ferrry Industrial Park 30 miles south of Knoxville in Vonore, Tennessee, will process two non-food feedstocks -- corncobs and switchgrass -- from farms around the Innovation Valley.
It seems hard to believe, but corncobs were the method of choice for Colonial Americans instead of toilet paper.
Steam engines also use solar energy, whether they burn wood, corncobs, or any other fuel.
But, even that tissue was an improvement over the newspapers, Sears catalog pages and corncobs used by families before the invention of toilet paper.
Typically, plant residues from harvested crops, such as corncobs and stalks, cereal straw, or seed hulls are the most common source.
While you're waiting for your maple trees to grow, try this recipe for making maple-tasting syrup from corncobs: "Break into small pieces about two dozen corncobs.