cord

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cord

 [kord]
any long, cylindrical, flexible structure; called also chord, chorda, and funiculus.
spermatic cord the structure extending from the abdominal inguinal ring to the testis, comprising the pampiniform plexus, nerves, ductus deferens, testicular artery, and other vessels.
spinal cord see spinal cord.
tethered cord a congenital anomaly resulting from defective closure of the neural tube; the conus medullaris is abnormally low and tethered by a short, thickened filum terminale, fibrous bands, intradural lipoma, or some other intradural abnormality. Surgical correction in infancy or early childhood is necessary to prevent progressive neurological deficit in the lower limb and bladder dysfunction.
umbilical cord see umbilical cord.
vocal c's see vocal cords.

cord

(kōrd), [TA] Avoid the misspelling chord.
1. In anatomy, any long ropelike structure, composed of several to many longitudinally oriented fibers, vessels, ducts, or combinations thereof.
See also: chorda.
2. In histopathology, a line of tumor cells only one cell in width.
Synonym(s): fasciculus (2) [TA], funiculus [TA], funicle
[L. chorda, a string]

cord

(kord) any long, cylindrical, flexible structure.
genital cord  in the embryo, the midline fused caudal part of the two urogenital ridges, each containing a mesonephric and paramesonephric duct.
gubernacular cord  a portion of the gubernaculum testis or of the round ligament of the uterus that develops in the inguinal crest and adjoining body wall.
sexual cords  the seminiferous tubules of the early fetus.
spermatic cord  the structure extending from the abdominal inguinal ring to the testis, comprising the pampiniform plexus, nerves, ductus deferens, testicular artery, and other vessels.
spinal cord  that part of the central nervous system lodged in the vertebral canal, extending from the foramen magnum to the upper part of the lumbar region.
umbilical cord  the structure connecting the fetus and placenta, and containing the vessels through which fetal blood passes to and from the placenta.
vocal cords  folds of mucous membrane in the larynx; the superior pair are called the false vocal cords and the inferior, the true vocal cords.
Willis' cords  fibrous bands traversing the inferior angle of the superior sagittal sinus.

cord

(kôrd)
n.
also chord Anatomy A long ropelike structure, such as a nerve or tendon: a spinal cord.

cord′er n.

cord

Etymology: Gk, chorde, string
any long, rounded, flexible structure. The body contains many different cords, such as the spermatic, vocal, spinal, neural, umbilical, and hepatic cords. Cords serve many different purposes, depending on location, kind of enclosed cells, and body parts or tissue involved.

cord

ENT See Fixed vocal cord, Spinal cord, Vocal cord Obstetrics See Umbilical cord.

cord

(kōrd) [TA]
1. anatomy Any long, ropelike structure. A small, cordlike structure composed of several to many longitudinally oriented fibers, vessels, ducts, or combinations thereof.
Synonym(s): fasciculus (2) [TA] , funiculus [TA] , funicle.
2. histopathology A line of tumor cells only one cell in width.
[L. chorda, a string]

cord

(kord) [Gr. khorde]
1. A stringlike structure.
2. The umbilical cord.
3. A firm, elongated structure consistent with a thrombosed vein, esp. in the extremities, where it may be felt on palpation.

nuchal cord

The condition in which the umbilical cord is found wrapped around the neck of the fetus during delivery. If the cord cannot be unwrapped easily, or if there is more than one loop, the cord should be clamped and cut before delivery continues.

splenic cord

A spongelike cord in the red pulp of the spleen composed of macrophages and dendritic cells. The macrophages phagocytize pathogens, cell debris, and cells that are old, abnormal, or damaged, esp. red blood cells. Phagocytosis may be increased when the spleen is enlarged (splenomegaly). Synonym: cords of Billroth

spermatic cord

The cord by which the testis is connected to the abdominal inguinal ring. It surrounds the ductus deferens, blood vessels, lymphatics, and nerves supplying the testis and epididymis. These are enclosed in the cremasteric fascia, which forms an investing sheath.
Enlarge picture
UMBILICAL CORD

umbilical cord

The attachment connecting the fetus with the placenta. It contains two arteries and one vein surrounded by a gelatinous substance (Wharton's jelly). The umbilical arteries carry blood from the fetus to the placenta, where nutrients are obtained and carbon dioxide and oxygen are exchanged; this oxygenated blood returns to the fetus through the umbilical vein. See: illustration

The umbilical cord is surgically severed after the birth of the child. To give the infant a better blood supply, the cord should not be cut or tied until the umbilical vessels have ceased pulsating. However, in preterm infants, the cord should be clamped and cut before pulsation ceases to avoid maternal-newborn transfusion and reduce the risk of hypovolemia, polycythemia, and hyperbilirubinemia.

The stump of the severed cord atrophies and leaves a depression on the abdomen of the child (the navel, umbilicus, or belly button).

Willis cord

See: Willis, Thomas

cord

(kōrd) [TA]
In anatomy, any long ropelike structure, composed of several to many longitudinally oriented fibers, vessels, ducts, or combinations thereof.
[L. chorda, a string]

cord(s),

n a long, rounded organ or body.
cord, spinal,
n the central nervous system cord contained in the vertebral column. It is essential to the regulation and administration of various motor, sensory, and autonomic nerve activities of the body. Through its pathways it conducts impulses from the extremities, trunk, and neck to and from the higher centers and to consciousness. It thus provides for simple reflexes, has control over visceral activities, and participates in the conscious activities of the body.
cord, vocal,
the membranous structures in the throat that produce sound; the thyroarytenoid ligaments of the larynx. The inferior cords are called the
true vocal cords, and the superior cords are called the
false vocal cords.

cord

any long, cylindrical, flexible structure.

angiogenic cord
the embryonic beginnings in the lateral mesenchyme of the dorsal aortae and aortic arches; at first solid they later become patent.
scirrhous cord
enlargement of the stump of the spermatic cord, common only in pigs and horses, and usually obvious within a few weeks of castration. The swelling may cause lameness, is painful and may be accompanied by systemic signs of fever and toxemia. The lesion is a mass of fibrous tissue interspersed with small abscess cavities and sinus tracts.
spermatic cord
the structure extending from the abdominal inguinal ring to the testis, comprising the pampiniform plexus, nerves, ductus deferens, cremaster muscle, vaginal tunics, testicular artery and other vessels.
spinal cord
umbilical cord
the structure connecting the fetus and placenta, and containing the channels through which fetal blood passes to and from the placenta.
vocal c's
see vocal cords.

Patient discussion about cord

Q. How can I fix my vocal cords? Please I am in need of desperate help.

A. rest, which means no talking,

Q. what does c4-5 mild central disk bulging impinging upon cervical cord without spinal stenosis or distortion of the cord . mild righ neural foraminal narrowing from uncovertebral joint hypertropy mean

A. Well this basically means there is a very small narrowing of the cervical (your neck area) spinal canal (where the spinal cord is), however the narrowing does not cause any damage to the spinal cord, therefore probably does not cause any major symptoms involving the nerves. The c4-5 bulging part refers to the part in between the two cervical vertebras c4 and c5, in which the disc (a part in the spinal cord) is sliding a bit side-ways, but again, it does not seem to be causing any trouble.

More discussions about cord
References in periodicals archive ?
76) It is a point of interest that in Ex Corde Ecclesiae John Paul appeals to Augustine's integration of faith and reason, and that Benedict, in his first Encyclical, appeals to Augustine's meditations on divine love.
By 1985, a draft of a Schema on Higher Education appeared, and vigorous discussions on what would become the Apostolic Constitution, Ex corde Ecclesiae, had begun.
10) See Steve Murphy, "Haunting Memories: Inquest and Exorcism in Baudelaire's 'La corde,'" Dalhousie French Studies 30 (1995), 90.
The controversy over Ex corde Ecclesiae arises over part two, "The Norms.
Bringing the latter to the light of day and constructively engaging the former will advance one of the goals implied in Fides et Ratio and explicitly stated in Ex Corde, (10) namely, to create a broader synthesis of knowledge.
The very first remedy that we asked of His Eminence, Donald Cardinal Wuerl, was: If the Holy Spirit leads you to it and your conscience will allow it, to declare publicly that Georgetown University is compliant with Ex corde Ecclesiae, orients its institutional initiatives according to standards that are consistent with the norms and morality of the Church, and lives up to the title 'Catholic,'" explained Blatty.
Completement ligote a la corde le 13 fevrier a Cagnes-sur-Mer, il a ensuite tarde a trouver l'ouverture le 4 avril a Maisons-Laffitte, finissant fort, mais trop tard.
The prince had earlier brought together his loves of the environment and whisky by opening the Helius Corde biomass plant - designed to turn whisky waste into electricity - and a bottling centre at the Glen Grant distillery.
Fratres carissimi, ex toto corde gratias ago vobis pro omni amore et labore, quo mecum
defmes its mission as helping "renew and strengthen Catholic identity in Catholic higher education" and pounding home adherence to Pope John Paul IF s 1990 apostolic constitution on Catholic colleges and universities, Ex Corde Ecclesiae.
The Vatican has over the years made many efforts to have the university's internal statues modified to be in line with John Paul II's document on higher education, "Ex Corde Ecclesiae" (From the heart of the Church).