coral snake

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snake

 [snāk]
any of many limbless reptiles; numerous species have venomous bites. See also snakebite.
coral snake any of various venomous pit vipers of the genera Micrurus and Micruroides; called also harlequin snake.
harlequin snake coral snake.

coral snake

n.
Any of various venomous elapid snakes chiefly of the genus Micrurus of tropical America and the southern United States, characteristically having bright red, yellow, and black bands.

coral snake

a poisonous snake with transverse red, yellow, and black bands that is native to the southern United States. Bites are rare; pain does not always result, but neuromuscular and respiratory effects may be severe. Immediate treatment includes keeping the victim quiet and immobilizing the bite area at the level of the heart. Ventilatory support should be provided. Antivenin is available.
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Coral snake

coral snake

References in periodicals archive ?
The first mobilization came from witch doctors, shamans (Annex 1), naturopaths, and all sorts of people who believed they had the cure for snakebites in general, but who could not come up with a specific solution for the bite of this coral snake.
The semiaquatic coral snake Micrurus surinamensis is widely distributed in equatorial forests in six countries of South America, feeding mainly on bony fishes and eels (Roze, 1966; Morais et al.
Venom researchers in Texas are now studying a possible Mexican substitute for Wyeth's coral snake antivenom, but if or until it becomes available, RTs in areas where Eastern and Texas Coral snakebites occur need to become aware of some of the issues surrounding this type of bite.
Coral snakes are in the family Elapidae and are found in the southeastern United States, Mexico, Central and South America.
Differential avoidance of coral snake banded patterns by free-ranging avian predators in Costa Rica.
A simple consistent terminology for the basic colour patterns of the venomous coral snakes and their mimics.
This is probably not based on predators having previous experience with coral snakes, because all it takes is one bite and you're dead.
Liz Hurley spent hours posing with two venomous coral snakes for a Vanity Fair photo in a bid to cast off her bimbo look for a dangerous, femme fatale image.
I don't know what will deter coral snakes but I regularly cut them in half with a shovel if they match the description "yella touches red makes a fella dead
Many of the venomous New World coral snakes (Micrurus and Micruroides) have a distinctive pattern of red, black, and yellow rings (Campbell and Lamar 1989; Savage and Slowinski 1992), which typically appear in the sequence red-yellow-black-yellow (the "tricolor monad" of Savage and Slowinski 1992) repeated multiple times on each snake.
The most common poisonous snakes in the United States are cottonmouths or water moccasins, copperheads, rattlesnakes, and coral snakes.
The snake is harmless, but it defends itself by imitating the alternating dark and light rings of venomous coral snakes.