coracobrachialis

cor·a·co·bra·chi·a·lis

(kōr'ă-kō-brā-kē-ā'lis),
Relating to the coracoid process of the scapula and the arm.
See also: coracobrachialis muscle, coracobrachial bursa.

coracobrachialis

[kôr′əkōbrā′kē·al′is]
a muscle with its origin on the scapula and its insertion on the inner side of the humerus. It functions to adduct and flex the arm.
enlarge picture
Coracobrachialis muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
lens cell skin tonsil limb lung ulna thumb molar vein spine throat muscle kidneys retina triceps sternum spleen keratin sacrum femur platelets arteries knuckle incisor intestine tibia epidermis cartilage vertebra chromosomes cornea dendrites melanin capillaries bronchi diaphragm abdomen larynx trachea thyroid glomeruli alveoli oculus mandible tricuspid cerumen esophagus talus glottis jejunum epiglottis mitochondrion coccyx hypothalamus sebum thalamus metacarpals phalanges insula intercilium xiphoid calcaneus peroneus epicondyle diencephalon brachioradialis thryrohyoideum cholagioles platysma gastrocnemius acetabulum laryngopharynx sternocleidomastoid genioglossus glossopharyngeum olecranon pterygopalatine coracobrachialis iliopsoas
The overlying fatty tissue is cleared in blunt fashion until the fascia overlying the pectoralis major, coracobrachialis, and biceps is identified and incised.
lens cell skin tonsil limb lung ulna thumb molar vein spine throat muscles kidneys retina triceps sternum spleen keratin sacrum femur platelets arteries knuckle incisor intestine tibia epidermis cartilage vertebra chromosomes cornea dendrites melanin capillaries bronchi diaphragm abdomen larynx trachea thyroid glomeruli alveoli oculus mandible tricuspid cerumen esophagus talus glottis jejunum epiglottis mitochondrion coccyx hypothalamus sebum thalamus metacarpals phalanges insula intercilium xiphoid calcaneus peroneus epicondyle diencephalon brachioradialis thyrohyoideum cholangioles platysma gastrochemius acetabulum laryngopharynx sternocleidomastoid genioglossus glossopharyngeum olecranon pterygopalatine coracobrachialis iliopsoas
One technique describes the transfer of the short head of the biceps tendon, the coracobrachialis and the tip of the coracoid process to the inferior surface of the distal end of the clavicle.
lens thyroid cell glomeruli skin alveoli tonsil oculus limb mandible lung tricuspid ulna cerumen thumb esophagus molar talus vein glottis spine jejunum throat epiglottis muscles mitochondrion kidneys coccyx retina hypothalamus triceps sebum sternum thalamus spleen metacarpals keratin phalanges sacrum insula femur intercilium platelets xiphoid arteries calcaneus knuckle peroneus incisor epicondyle intestine diencephalon tibia brachioradialis epidermis thyrohyoideum cartilage cholangioles vertebra platysma chromosomes gastrocnemius cornea acetabulum dendrites laryngopharynx melanin sternocleidomastoid capillaries genioglossus bronchi glossopharyngeum diaphragm olecranon abdomen pterygopalatine larynx coracobrachialis trachea iliopsoas
When longstanding subluxation or dislocation is present, partial coracoid resection, with or without release of the coracohumeral ligament, and coracobrachialis fractional lengthening may be necessary to obtain concentric glenohumeral reduction.
The coracoclavicular and coracoacromial ligaments, as well as the coracobrachialis, short head of the biceps, and pectoralis minor have all been implicated in coracoid avulsion fractures through indirect mechanisms.
Anesthesia of the forearm is incomplete unless the musculocutaneous nerve is also blocked, either at the antecubital fossa or the coracobrachialis muscle.
73) The purpose of the transfer is to provide a dynamic sling effect of the coracobrachialis over the anterior glenohumeral joint with the arm in 90[degrees] abduction; no attempt is made to reconstruct an osseous rim defect with this procedure.
Strengthening of the long head of the biceps, coracobrachialis, and anterior deltoid can be achieved with forward flexion exercises, limiting flexion to 90[degrees].
glossopharyngeum olecranon pterygopalatine coracobrachialis iliopsoas
coracobrachialis caudalis, the sternocoracoideus, the subscapularis, and the humerotriceps (Fig 5).