coolant

(redirected from Cooling liquid)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

coolant (kōō´lənt),

n air or liquid directed onto a tooth, tissue, or restoration to neutralize the heating effect of a rotary instrument.

coolant

a substance used to cool a system to below a specified level by conducting heat generated by the system away from it.
References in periodicals archive ?
9 is a coefficient that depends of the number of abrasive grains that work at maximum capacity, [mu]--is the friction coefficient between abrasive grain and work piece surface in the presence of cooling liquid, [gamma]--is the rake angle of the abrasive grain in radians(fig.
The system efficiently transports the heat out of the tube housing into a separate cooling liquid reservoir, increasing the heat capacity to about 5 million heat units.
With over 40 of our own stores both here and abroad, our presence at Parisian allows us to reach the Southern customer, where we experience tremendous success with products like Cooling Liquid Talc -- particularly appropriate for climates and lifestyles in this part of the country," said H2O Plus Marketing Manager Julie Sloan.
6A[bar]F, this indirect cooling technology pumps outside air to lower the temperature of the cooling liquid, which is used to cool the data center.
To protect the plants from this heat below, a sophisticated network of tubing will circulate cooling liquids to protect the plants' roots.
The double mechanical seal option is designed for the circulation or flushing of cooling liquids and can be used with products that tend to crystallise, adhere, solidify, or are abrasive and corrosive.
EoACAoRaw materials associated with vehicles such as plastics, scrap tires, used engine oil, cooling liquids and battery acid are extremely hazardous to the environment if disposal is not closely monitored.
In addition, cooling liquids are not very good at transferring heat.
Two technologies for removing heat from electronic devices--synthetic jets that rely on trains of turbulent air puffs, and a system that uses vibration to atomize cooling liquids such as water--were developed by Professor Ari Glezer and co-workers at the Georgia Institute of Technology's School of Mechanical Engineering, and licensed to Atlanta-based Innovative Fluidics.
Many of the cooling liquids can do duty in desserts as well.