convection

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current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.

con·vec·tion

(kon-vek'shŭn),
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

/con·vec·tion/ (kon-vek´shun) the act of conveying or transmission, specifically transmission of heat in a liquid or gas by bulk movement of heated particles to a cooler area.convec´tive

convection

[kənvek′shən]
Etymology: L, convehere, to bring together
(in physics) the transfer of heat through a gas or liquid by the circulation of heated particles.

con·vec·tion

(kŏn-vek'shŭn)
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

the propagation of heat through liquids and gases by the movement of the heated particles, increasing their kinetic energy.

convection

the act of conveying or transmission; specifically, transmission of heat in a liquid or gas by circulation of heated particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of mass transfer and free convection currents on the flow past an impulsively started vertical plate, J.
From the present numerical investigation we observed that velocity profiles decrease with the increase of permeability parameter while it increases with the increase of free convection currents.
Only the details of the local densities, temperatures, composition, opacities, radiative emission, and convection currents, are altered.
In certain areas of a glass oven door, convection currents between the layers of glass are minimized or eliminated in order to avoid excessive temperatures on the outer surface of the door.
This primary structure carries purlins and rafters in the normal way, with the rafters strutted at the same angle as the struts on the tied portals, creating in effect an inverted ridge that acts as a continuous lantern because, above it, the real ridge is defined by a motorized greenhouse glazing system that can be thrown open on hot days to encourage cooling convection currents.
Second, these methods are inefficient, relying on the transfer of heat by convection currents from the energy source to the reaction vessel and then to the reactants through bulk heating of the system.
In addition, temperature differences between day and night are small and so there are no convection currents to move the oxygen-rich surface layers to the deeper layers.
Natural convection currents are induced by forces due to differences in variations between the device surface temperature and the surrounding ambient temperature; that is, heat is directly picked up by the air and transported away.
By releasing water vapor through their leaves, plants create convection currents in the air that draw VOCs down to the soil where microorganisms biodegrade them.
Although Galileo entered through a hole in the clouds, scientists still are confounded that it didn't encounter moisture during descent, because internal heat creates convection currents that should ``bring up the moisture,'' Ingersoll said.
The sleek, stylish model, available in a pearl gray and matte black finish, draws cool air from the floor and returns warmed air to the room through natural convection currents that create a wide, deep comfort zone.
You can see the convection currents inside the wick.