convection

(redirected from Convection current)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.

con·vec·tion

(kon-vek'shŭn),
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

/con·vec·tion/ (kon-vek´shun) the act of conveying or transmission, specifically transmission of heat in a liquid or gas by bulk movement of heated particles to a cooler area.convec´tive

convection

[kənvek′shən]
Etymology: L, convehere, to bring together
(in physics) the transfer of heat through a gas or liquid by the circulation of heated particles.

con·vec·tion

(kŏn-vek'shŭn)
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

the propagation of heat through liquids and gases by the movement of the heated particles, increasing their kinetic energy.

convection

the act of conveying or transmission; specifically, transmission of heat in a liquid or gas by circulation of heated particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Planck has previously warned that the presence of convection currents is sufficient to completely destroy local thermal equilibrium arguments [39].
Heat from Earth's core creates the convection currents needed for plate tectonics.
Convection currents that stir the outer core are critical to producing the superfast spin of the inner core, say Jonathan M.
Stirring is accomplished with a motor-driven graphite impeller, except in most induction furnaces, where the convection currents make mechanical stirring unnecessary.
A Middle-Eastern inspired wind tower, making use of convection currents, lies at the heart of the building services concept.
As a result, they can now see more precisely how convection currents, which alter the way heat diffuses through a cooling metal, can influence the growth rate and curvature of dendrites.
One camp, call them the lumpers, believes that convection currents stir the entire mantle, mixing both the upper and lower parts of this layer.
But on closer inspection, our home star actually behaves like a bubbling cauldron, with heat-driven convection currents setting vibrations ringing throughout its interior.
He suggests that the start of nuclear fusion at the protostar's core would produce convection currents, which in turn could generate a magnetic field large enough to drive a stellar wind.
Many planetary scientists have believed that an intrinsic magnetic field requires a "dynamo" effect, in which internal heat creates convection currents within a rotating planet.
For example, the sun may have a different composition, internal temperature or pattern of convection currents than assumed in the standard model.