contraindicate

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contraindicate

(kŏn′trə-ĭn′dĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. contraindi·cated, contraindi·cating, contraindi·cates
To indicate the inadvisability of (a medical treatment, for example).

con′tra·in·dic′a·tive (-ĭn-dĭk′ə-tĭv) adj.

contraindicate

[kon′trə·in′dikāt]
Etymology: L, contra, against, indicare, to make known
to report the presence of a disease or physical condition that makes it impossible or undesirable to treat a particular client in the usual manner or to prescribe medicines that might otherwise be suitable.

con·tra·in·di·cate

(kontră-indi-kāt)
To avoid a protocol or treatment based on specific prevailing circumstances.
References in periodicals archive ?
This contraindication does not apply to LASEK or lens replacement surgery
Women's ability to self-screen for contraindications to combined oral contraceptive pills in Tanzanian drug shops, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2013,123(1):37-41.
In the absence of contraindications, blockade of the angiotensin pathway (with either ACEi or angiotensin II receptor blocker) should begin as soon as possible following an acute MI.
Out of the 30 respondents only one observed the contraindication of Asthmatic patient with acute breathlessness and Aspirin 300mg but also did not react as he should and dispensed the medicine.
Those providers who preferred an abdominal approach also reported significantly more contraindications than did MIS providers to vaginal hysterectomy (mean 4.
They found that 8% of 121,286 migraine patients had a cardiovascular contraindication, such as a history of myocardial infarction or stroke or documented prescriptions for cardiovascular disease.
Haymarket said the new title provides prescribing information for the range of medical professionals and editorial includes over 1400 product monographs relevant to long-term case, with listing of brand and generic name, manufacturer, class, indications, dose, contraindications, precautions, interactions, adverse reactions and method of supply.
Behrman cited sponsors' failure to improve the clarity and brevity of labeling in the Contraindications and Adverse Reactions sections as one area with which the agency was particularly dissappointed.
Information on demographics, willingness to receive smallpox vaccine, self-reported knowledge level, and potential vaccine contraindications was analyzed.
Once those patients identified with legitimate contraindications to therapy were culled from the database, the charts of the remaining patients (those with atrial fibrillation not on medicine without obvious contraindication) were referred to their physicians for review.
Before revaccination, the patient reported no contraindications to vaccination and denied any conditions that typically weaken the immune system (including HIV/AIDS, leukemia, lymphoma, other cancers, radiation, chemotherapy, organ transplant, post-transplant therapy, immunosuppressive medications, severe autoimmune disease, and primary immune deficiency).