contraceptive

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Related to Contraceptives: Oral contraceptives

contraceptive

 [kon″trah-sep´tiv]
1. diminishing the likelihood of or preventing conception.
2. an agent that does this; see also contraception.
oral contraceptive a compound, usually hormonal, taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy. See also contraception.

con·tra·cep·tive

(kon'tră-sep'tiv),
1. An agent to prevent conception.
2. Relating to any measure or agent designed to prevent conception.
[L. contra, against, + conceptive]

contraceptive

/con·tra·cep·tive/ (-sep´tiv)
1. diminishing the likelihood of or preventing conception.
2. an agent that so acts.

barrier contraceptive  a contraceptive device that physically prevents spermatozoa from entering the endometrial cavity and fallopian tubes.
chemical contraceptive  a spermicidal agent inserted into the vagina before intercourse to prevent pregnancy.
emergency contraceptive  postcoital c.
intrauterine contraceptive  see under device.
oral contraceptive  a hormonal compound taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy.
postcoital contraceptive  one that blocks or terminates pregnancy after sexual intercourse.

contraceptive

(kŏn′trə-sĕp′tĭv)
adj.
Relating to or capable of preventing contraception.
n.
A contraceptive drug or device, such as a birth control pill or a condom.

contraceptive

[kon′trəsep′tiv]
Etymology: L, contra + concipere, to take in
any device or technique that prevents conception. See also contraception.

contraceptive

adjective Relating to contraception.
 
noun Any device or method for preventing fertilisation.
 
Types
Barrier methods (condoms, diaphragms), hormone combinations, spermicides, implantable hormonal devices, RU-486 and others.

contraceptive

Obstetrics adjective Relating to contraception noun Any device or method for preventing fertilization, or a term product of conception Types Barrier methods–condoms, diaphragms, hormone combinations, spermicides, implantable hormonal devices, RU-486, etc. See Contraception, Dalkon shield, IUD, 'Litogen. ', Lunelle, Mirena, Nuvaring, Oral contraceptive, Ortho Evra, Pearl index, RU-486, Seasonale, Sequential oral contraceptive, Wrongful birth.

con·tra·cep·tive

(kon'tră-sep'tiv)
1. An agent that prevents conception.
2. Relating to any measure or agent designed to prevent conception.
[L. contra, against, + conceptive]

contraceptive

see BIRTH CONTROL.

contraceptive

1. diminishing the likelihood of or preventing conception.
2. an agent that diminishes the likelihood of or prevents conception. See also contraception.

Patient discussion about contraceptive

Q. Does it exist a Birth Control Shot for men?

A. No. Currently there are no available medications for birth control for men. However, there are several other methods, including barrier methods (condom) and more irreversible ones (e.g. vasectomy) which may require a treatment by a surgeon.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001946.htm

Q. BIRTH CONTROL how many types are there?

A. HI doctor-you forgot one--THE CELL PHONE RADIATION,next time you go out on a date dont forget your cell phone and a piece of string.HA HA ---mrfoot56

Q. how long after i have stop taking birth control pills can i get pregnant?

A. After you stop taking the pill, you may have only a two-week delay before you ovulate again. Once ovulation resumes, you can become pregnant. If this happens during your first cycle off the pill, you may not have a period at all. However, although possible, this scenario isn't likely.

More discussions about contraceptive
References in periodicals archive ?
Over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives with accompanying full insurance coverage or cost supports.
Acceptability of the Nestorone[R]/ethinyl estradiol contraceptive vaginal ring: Development of a model; implications for introduction" Contraception 90(5): 514-521.
Combined oral contraceptives are believed to be effective for pregnancy prevention, but "may be less forgiving of imperfect use," and thus may not be the best choice in those who may have problems with adherence, she said.
In the multivariate discrete-time models, women in the postabortion group were more likely than those in the postpartum group to have initiated contraceptive use earlier within 12 months (hazard ratio, 2.
In 2011, the FDA's Reproductive Health Drugs Advisory Committee met to discuss safety questions about oral contraceptives that contain the progestin drospirenone.
Survey participants were also asked whether specific contraceptive methods were simply "not available" to their patients.
What women believe about oral contraceptives and the effect of counseling, Contraception, 2004, 69(1):31-36.
60 respectively, with oral contraceptives and barrier methods yielding $4.
Among those women, the most common choices were oral contraceptives (23%), male condoms (23%), intrauterine devices (12%), and withdrawal (10%).
The study's authors said oral contraceptive use has already prevented 200,000 cases of ovarian cancer and 100,000 deaths worldwide since the pill was introduced almost 50 years ago.
This table suggests actions for hormonal contraceptive users and family planning and VCT providers, based on a couple's HIV status.
Every potentially fertile couple should therefore take cognisance of this giant stride by utilising contraceptives effectively and consistently to prevent unplanned and unwanted pregnancies.