contraceptive


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

contraceptive

 [kon″trah-sep´tiv]
1. diminishing the likelihood of or preventing conception.
2. an agent that does this; see also contraception.
oral contraceptive a compound, usually hormonal, taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy. See also contraception.

con·tra·cep·tive

(kon'tră-sep'tiv),
1. An agent to prevent conception.
2. Relating to any measure or agent designed to prevent conception.
[L. contra, against, + conceptive]

contraceptive

/con·tra·cep·tive/ (-sep´tiv)
1. diminishing the likelihood of or preventing conception.
2. an agent that so acts.

barrier contraceptive  a contraceptive device that physically prevents spermatozoa from entering the endometrial cavity and fallopian tubes.
chemical contraceptive  a spermicidal agent inserted into the vagina before intercourse to prevent pregnancy.
emergency contraceptive  postcoital c.
intrauterine contraceptive  see under device.
oral contraceptive  a hormonal compound taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy.
postcoital contraceptive  one that blocks or terminates pregnancy after sexual intercourse.

contraceptive

(kŏn′trə-sĕp′tĭv)
adj.
Relating to or capable of preventing contraception.
n.
A contraceptive drug or device, such as a birth control pill or a condom.

contraceptive

[kon′trəsep′tiv]
Etymology: L, contra + concipere, to take in
any device or technique that prevents conception. See also contraception.

contraceptive

adjective Relating to contraception.
 
noun Any device or method for preventing fertilisation.
 
Types
Barrier methods (condoms, diaphragms), hormone combinations, spermicides, implantable hormonal devices, RU-486 and others.

contraceptive

Obstetrics adjective Relating to contraception noun Any device or method for preventing fertilization, or a term product of conception Types Barrier methods–condoms, diaphragms, hormone combinations, spermicides, implantable hormonal devices, RU-486, etc. See Contraception, Dalkon shield, IUD, 'Litogen. ', Lunelle, Mirena, Nuvaring, Oral contraceptive, Ortho Evra, Pearl index, RU-486, Seasonale, Sequential oral contraceptive, Wrongful birth.

con·tra·cep·tive

(kon'tră-sep'tiv)
1. An agent that prevents conception.
2. Relating to any measure or agent designed to prevent conception.
[L. contra, against, + conceptive]

contraceptive

see BIRTH CONTROL.

contraceptive

1. diminishing the likelihood of or preventing conception.
2. an agent that diminishes the likelihood of or prevents conception. See also contraception.

Patient discussion about contraceptive

Q. Does it exist a Birth Control Shot for men?

A. No. Currently there are no available medications for birth control for men. However, there are several other methods, including barrier methods (condom) and more irreversible ones (e.g. vasectomy) which may require a treatment by a surgeon.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001946.htm

Q. BIRTH CONTROL how many types are there?

A. HI doctor-you forgot one--THE CELL PHONE RADIATION,next time you go out on a date dont forget your cell phone and a piece of string.HA HA ---mrfoot56

Q. how long after i have stop taking birth control pills can i get pregnant?

A. After you stop taking the pill, you may have only a two-week delay before you ovulate again. Once ovulation resumes, you can become pregnant. If this happens during your first cycle off the pill, you may not have a period at all. However, although possible, this scenario isn't likely.

More discussions about contraceptive
References in periodicals archive ?
Last fall, a study conducted in seven sub-Saharan African countries raised questions about whether using progesterone contraceptive injections (like Depo Provera) might increase a woman's risk of transmittin8 and acquirin8 HIV infection.
Only 28% of the women reported consulting their neurologist before selecting a contraceptive method.
Overall, with the exception of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD, Mirena)--for which on-site availability was reported by 56% of office-based physicians and 47% of Title X clinic providers--office-based physicians were less likely than were Title X clinics to report on-site availability of a range of contraceptive methods.
In addition to our own studies and experience, the peer-reviewed literature (6,17-22) provides compelling evidence that advances in contraceptive service delivery have failed to keep pace with advances in contraceptive technologies.
About 20 percent of women in the study switched from less effective contraceptive methods, including unprotected sex and condoms, to more effective means following emergency contraceptive pill use.
Of these, the most effective in preventing unintended pregnancy are sterilization and LARC methods, which do not require the user's compliance in order to be effective (except injectables which require visiting a health practitioner for a jab every three months), followed by other hormonal methods such as the contraceptive pill.
This table suggests actions for hormonal contraceptive users and family planning and VCT providers, based on a couple's HIV status.
This literature review aims to identify and describe factors impacting on contraceptive practices among women of reproductive ages.
Although contraceptive prevalence in developing countries hovered at about 10% in the mid-1960s, it is about 60% today.
About a dozen states have passed laws to allow health-care providers to refuse to dispense contraceptives, but none have passed laws requiring them to, according to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.
The retrospective approach is based on the inclusion of couples who already had a pregnancy; prospective approaches (detailed and not) are most often based on the inclusion of couples who will soon discontinue contraceptive use; and the current duration approach is based on the inclusion of couples currently trying to conceive.
Last fall, Joakim Larsson of Goteborg University in Sweden found that a used contraceptive patch can, if flushed down the toilet, shed estrogen into rivers that accept effluent from sewage-treatment facilities (SN: 10/19/02, p.