kaizen

(redirected from Continuous improvement)
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kaizen

(ki'zen?) [Japanese kaizen, improvement]
Management of inventory stock and work processes in industry, adapted to health care institutions.
Synonym: continuous performance improvement
References in periodicals archive ?
The Welsh Government and Aerospace Wales Forum will be promoting and raising awareness of the SC21 programme with funding available to help businesses take their first step on the journey of continuous improvement.
The research, co-written with Luis Delfin, a former graduate student, has advanced 3 arguments on how workers' commitment to continuous improvement in the workplace can be enhanced.
The author then presents tools for implementing continuous improvement in the social studies classroom and incorporating math concepts in social studies.
Most have simply changed chemistry, bought some new equipment or reordered old processes without really applying continuous improvement methods.
The philosophy and technique of continuous improvement runs counter to traditional methods of factory operation and maintenance.
purchased the Ashdown, Arkansas, USA mill from Georgia-Pacific in 2001, it introduced the Domtar culture--including a continuous improvement process based on the Japanese principle of "Kaizen.
These steps are defining the project plan and key milestones, building a structure to assess the controls, obtaining input on the design of company-level controls, documenting and assessing the controls, testing their effectiveness, and engaging in gap remediation and continuous improvement.
He added the concept of kaizen, or continuous improvement, to improve the quality of the Toyota car.
In this paper I will show how these components have been embedded in the curriculum of a master's degree program for practicing teachers that seeks to enhance teacher professional development by providing a curriculum that is centered on teacher research (Ball, 1996, Cochran-Smith and Lytle, 1999, Schwartz, 1988, Zumwalt, 1988), reflection (Greene, 1978; Giroux, 1988), collaboration (Friend and Cook, 1992, Goodlad, 1984, Lieberman, 1987, Lyons, 1998) and continuous improvement (Deming, 1995).
When this happens, a baseline for and path to continuous improvement in the effectiveness, accountability, and productivity of management is created.
While the desire to improve service may be only one factor in effecting these changes, it does offer encouragement for the ability of libraries and their staffs to commit to continuous improvement.
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