conditional

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conditional

(kən-dĭsh′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Imposing, depending on, or containing a condition.
2. Psychology Brought about by conditioning.

con·di′tion·al′i·ty (-dĭsh′ə-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
con·di′tion·al·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also see Gould, "Human Equality Is a Contingent Fact of History.
This means that, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, we may infer, about any particular wholly contingent fact, that it has a cause.
Clark therefore has no reason to relocate the systematicity dispute away from semantic, or cognitive, systematicity to behavioral systematicity, and therefore no reason to claim that cognitive level systematicity stands in need of no empirical explanation; as far as he has shown, it is a contingent fact about our cognitive abilities, and one that begs for explanation.
Yet this does not have the awful consequences one might fear, for as a matter of contingent fact one's benefitting oneself is not compatible with harming others.
The need for a metaphysics of physical objects to be neutral about contingent facts does not sit well with Heller's principle of non-coincidence which he repeatedly invokes and rates a necessary truth.
4) On the other hand, Wittgenstein was also concerned with the apparently more theoretical question of how it is possible for there to be value at all in a world of contingent facts.
This in no way denies that many facts--indeed, all facts about the world except those at the very highest or necessary level of abstraction--are contingent, and therefore the scientific method, proper to critical reasoning about some contingent facts, is autonomous within the realm to which it applies.
Here O'Connor argues, essentially following Aquinas, that the only answer to such questions, the only complete answer, is to be found in an ultimate necessity, indeed a necessary being, whose essence is to be: "If there is to be an ultimate, or complete, explanation, it will have to ground in some way the most fundamental, contingent facts of the universe in a necessary being, something which has the reason for its existence within its own nature.
Beyond the contingent facts, the basic question seems to me: Do they want to accept and protect the fundamental rights of freedom of conscience and freedom of religion that are the basis of every form of civil and pluralistic coexistence?
Keith Campbell argues that contingent facts about vision processes undercut many theories of colour, including Armstrong's.
And when he says that he defends the claim that "nothing relevant to moral choice separates human beings from animals except historically contingent facts of the world, cultural facts," one gasps in amazement at the arbitrariness this implies in the choice to save one's child rather than the family dog if both could not be saved.
Interpretations, however, are never true--at least in this sense--because they merely express the values of the interpreter, which depend on contingent facts about him, such as his personal history and the attitudes of his community.