constellation

(redirected from Constellations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

con·stel·la·tion

(kon'stel-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, all the factors that determine a particular action.
[L.L. constellatio, fr. cum, together, + stella, star]

constellation

(kŏn″stĕl-lā′shŭn) [L. con, together, + stella, star]
A group, set, or configuration of objects, individuals, or conditions.
References in classic literature ?
They are like some wise men, who, learning to know each planet by its Latin name, have quite forgotten such small heavenly constellations as Charity, Forbearance, Universal Love, and Mercy, although they shine by night and day so brightly that the blind may see them; and who, looking upward at the spangled sky, see nothing there but the reflection of their own great wisdom and book- learning.
Glegg's slate-colored silk gown must have been; but from certain constellations of small yellow spots upon it, and a mouldy odor about it suggestive of a damp clothes-chest, it was probable that it belonged to a stratum of garments just old enough to have come recently into wear.
Stubb longed for vermillion stars to be painted upon the blade of his every oar; screwing each oar in his big vice of wood, the carpenter symmetrically supplies the constellation.
One thinks Heidelberg by day--with its surroundings-- is the last possibility of the beautiful; but when he sees Heidelberg by night, a fallen Milky Way, with that glittering railway constellation pinned to the border, he requires time to consider upon the verdict.
Its seven letters seemed to hang right across the clouds like the Seven Stars, an apocalyptic constellation, a veritable sky sign; and again the name was an angel standing with a silver trumpet, and again it was a song.
I admired the strength, comeliness, and speed of the inhabitants; and such a constellation of virtues, in such amiable persons, produced in me the highest veneration.
What a constellation of attractions to centre in one man
Tess's face and neck reflected the same warmth, which each gem turned into an Aldebaran or a Sirius--a constellation of white, red, and green flashes, that interchanged their hues with her every pulsation.
We want the great genius only for joy; for one star more in our constellation, for one tree more in our grove.
Back it came, with the editor's regrets, and Martin sent it to San Francisco again, this time to THE HORNET, a pretentious monthly that had been fanned into a constellation of the first magnitude by the brilliant journalist who founded it.
She passed over the constellation of the Twins, and was now nearing the halfway point between the horizon and the zenith.
The star you refer to is Gamma, of the constellation Cassiopeia.