consonant

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con·so·nant

(kon'sŏ-nănt)
A speech sound produced by partial or complete obstruction to the flow of air at any point in the vocal apparatus.
[L. consono, to sound together]

con·so·nant

(kon'sŏ-nănt)
A speech sound produced by partial or complete obstruction to the flow of air at any point in the vocal apparatus.
[L. consono, to sound together]

consonant,

n a conventional speech sound produced, with or without laryngeal vibration, by certain successive contractions of the articulatory muscles that modify, interrupt, or obstruct the expired airstream to the extent that its pressure is raised.
consonant, semivowel,
n consonants that are like vowels both perceptually and physiologically.
References in periodicals archive ?
and [Y] are examples of consonants with the most forward tongue arch.
The best point of comparison for chapter 3 on Estonian consonants would be the second part of Eek's phonetic work, but the latter still remains unpublished.
Moreover, all examples belong to auditory type, in which a periodic sound of sibilants causes a change in the order of consonants.
The Percentage of Correct Consonant Index was calculated by the number of correct consonants of the speech sample obtained from the three ABFW tests.
For some consonants, even these features showed promising results but the overall performance of these features was not satisfactory (Fig-2).
This is because the so called geminate consonants in OD result from the elision of a high vowel in between two identical consonants.
Reconstructing Proto-Afroasiatic {Proto-Afrasian): Vowels, Tone, Consonants, and Vocabulary.
A typical peculiarity of these combinations is the fact, that they are frequently emerged as a result of adding of two consonants of additional word component to the existing combinations; usually, it is the consonants [v] and [s], more rarely - [k].
The voiceless plosive consonants MP *p, *t, *k regularly derived in ISP as *p, *t, and *k in all position of the word; beginning, between vowels and at the end of the word.
As mentioned above according to this principle possible consonants of a syllable are maximized to the left of V (peak) and then the operation of final consonants is carried out maximally to the right of V (peak).
There are two types of Lithuanian diphthongs: 9 pure (Vowel-Vowel structure (VV)) and 20 mixed diphthongs, that are made of vowels "a", "e", "i", "u" and consonants "l", "m", "n", "r" and has the Vowel-Consonant structure (VC) [12].