cluster

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Related to Consonant cluster: diphthong

cluster

 [klus´ter]
a group of similar objects, events, or other elements in close proximity.
suicide cluster a group of suicides in which one seems to set off others.

clus·ter

(klŭs'ter),
A group of similar or identical objects occurring naturally in close proximity (as grapes) or so assembled (as beads).
[O.E. clyster]

cluster

A generic term for any of the regions in the UK (Eastern, North East, North West and West Midlands, London, and Southern) created after consultation with Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs) on how to best deliver local Information Technology solutions as part of the NHS Care Records initiative.

clus·ter

(klŭstĕr)
A group of similar or identical objects occurring naturally in close proximity (as grapes) or so assembled (as beads).
[O.E. clyster]

cluster,

n in epidemiology, a composite of confirmed cases of a disease, defect, or disability that occur in close proximity to one another with regard to time or space.

cluster

1. in epidemiological terms a naturally occurring group of similar units, e.g. animals which resemble each other, with respect to one or more variables, more than animals in different groups do, or a group of cases of a single disease in time or space.
2. assembly of claw and teat cups, as part of a milking machine.

cluster analysis
1. statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly interrelated subgroups.
2. a statistical analysis of the relationships between clusters in time and/or space.
cluster fly
see polleniarudis.
cluster sampling
see cluster sampling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Emmerick prepared a chart showing the historical derivations of the resulting consonant clusters.
The analysis shows that except for /rj/ sound all consonants and possible bi-partite consonant clusters can be marked as the onset of a syllable which implies that Tanawal dialect follows the principle of maximal onset.
Her arguments include: (a) /ts/ occurs word-initially in roots, and there are no consonant clusters word-initially without prefixing, (b) coda clusters are limited to two consonants, (c) both elements of the affricate are pronounced syllable-finally, which is not always the case for consonant clusters, and (d) [s] is merely an allophone of /ts/.
In choosing the words, care was taken to include words with various types of syllables, for example, words that do not change phonologically, words with consonant clusters in the initial, mid and final positions, words with consonant geminates, vowel hiatus and long vowels.
This means that when studying, writing from memory, and checking the spelling of a word with a complex consonant cluster (e.
Duncan, Seymour, and Hill (1997) reported that chldren made fewer errors on simple consonants than on complex consonants and consonant clusters in a task that required children to identify spoken words sharing common phonemes.
In a trisyllabic word with the open and short 1st and 2nd syllable gemination occurs only if there is a weak-grade equivalent of a consonant cluster at the boundary of the 2nd and 3rd syllable.
According to Jones (1976) a consonant cluster is the sequence of consonants that appear in a syllable without a vowel between them and which can be studied in terms of graphemes, phones and phonemes.
In all three of these cases, however, consonant clusters of the type that would be produced if a copy of the final foot were suffixed are phonotactically impermissible, making it possible to suggest that the appearance of infixation is actually the result of juxtaposition and consonant cluster reduction (omotumun-tumun [right arrow] omotumutumun).
The retroflex allophone was not reported in consonant clusters.
In 'Syllable Structure and Sonority Sequencing: Evidence from Emilian', Michele Loporcaro discusses cases such as [tstimoni] 'witness', where a word-initial consonant cluster apparently violates the normal pattern whereby consonants further from the vocalic nucleus of the syllable have a lower 'sonority' than those nearer to it.
The vocalism as well as the medial consonant cluster match exactly, and the only unexpected detail is the initial *j- in the Mari verb.