connexins

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con·nex·ins

(kŏ-neks'inz),
Complex protein assemblies; a group of six makes up a connexon.
See also: connexons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prelingual deafness: high prevalence of a 30delG mutation in the connexin 26 gene.
Contribution of pannexin 1 and connexin 43 hemichannels to extracellular calcium-dependent transport dynamics in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.
Lens cells in eye, accomplished intracellular communication via an immense network of gap junctions formed by the structural proteins belongs to connexin family, to permit the trafficking of ions and small solutes of size C (pE368Q) (GenBank KY556641) point mutation that substitutes glutamic acid, at position 368 with glutamine in patient sample A14 (Fig.
In mice with a deletion of connexin 26, prenatal or postnatal supplementation with beta-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium slowed hearing loss progression and improved hearing thresholds.
The report provides comprehensive information on the Connexin (Gap Junction Protein) , targeted therapeutics, complete with analysis by indications, stage of development, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type.
Transcriptional regulation of connexin 43 expression by retinoids and carotenoids: similarities and differences.
A study found that an antioxidant regimen of beta carotene (precursor to vitamin A), vitamins C and E and magnesium helped slow progression of hereditary deafness in mice, with a deletion in Connexin 26 gene a protein found on the gene and the most common cause of innate hearing loss,Health News reported.
5) Twenty-one human connexin genes have been identified.
Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the major component of gap junctions in the ventricular myocytes, and it is one of the important connexins in the atria.
Interaction between Connexin 43 and nitric oxide synthase in mice heart mitochondria," Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, vol.
TEHRAN (FNA)- How does a protein called connexin put the clamps on cancer?