Congenital

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congenital

 [kon-jen´ĭ-t'l]
existing at, and usually before, birth; referring to conditions that are present at birth, regardless of their causation. Cf. hereditary.
congenital heart defect a structural defect of the heart or great vessels or both, present at birth. Any number of defects may occur, singly or in combination. They result from improper development of the heart and blood vessels during the prenatal period. Congenital heart defects occur in about 8 to 10 of every 1000 live-born children in the United States. The most common types are tetralogy of fallot, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, transposition of great vessels, and coarctation of the aorta.

In many cases, depending on the severity of the defect and the physical condition of the patient, these congenital conditions can be treated by surgery. However, some are so minor that they do not significantly affect the action of the heart and do not require surgery. The cause of most of these conditions is unknown. Gene abnormalities account for about 5 per cent, and in a small number of other cases they may be seen in a child whose pregnant mother had rubella (German measles) during the first 2 or 3 months of pregnancy.

con·gen·i·tal

(kon-jen'i-tăl), Do not confuse this word with hereditary, heredofamilial, familial, or genetic.
Existing at birth, referring to certain mental or physical traits, anomalies, malformations, diseases, and like findings, which may be either hereditary or due to an influence occurring during gestation up to the moment of birth.
Synonym(s): congenitus
[L. congenitus, born with]

congenital

/con·gen·i·tal/ (kon-jen´ĭ-t'l) existing at, and usually before, birth; referring to conditions that are present at birth, regardless of their causation.

congenital

(kən-jĕn′ĭ-tl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a condition that is present at birth, as a result of either heredity or environmental influences: a congenital heart defect; congenital syphilis.
2. Usage Problem Being or having an essential characteristic as if by nature; inherent or inveterate: "the congenital American optimism that denies conflicts and imagines all stories having happy endings" (Robert J. Samuelson).

con·gen′i·tal·ly adv.

congenital

[kənjen′itəl]
Etymology: L, congenitus, born with
present at birth, as a congenital anomaly or defect. Compare acquired, familial, hereditary.

congenital

adjective Referring to a condition present at birth, regardless of cause.

congenital

adjective Referring to a condition present at birth, regardless of causation

con·gen·i·tal

(kŏn-jen'i-tăl)
Existing at birth, referring to mental or physical traits, anomalies, malformations, or diseases, which may be either hereditary or due to an influence occurring during gestation up to the moment of birth. usage note Often misused as a synonym of hereditary.
[L. congenitus, born with]

congenital

Present at birth and resulting from factors operating before birth. A congenital disorder need not be hereditary, although many are. Conditions acquired during fetal life are congenital as are those acquired during the process of birth.

congenital

existing at or before birth and referring especially to defects and diseases that are environmental in origin and not inherited.

Congenital

Existing at or before birth; a condition that developed while the fetus was in utero or as a consequence of the birth process.

congenital

present at birth, e.g. due to a prenatal or genetic process

congenital 

Pertaining to a condition that dates from the time of birth. It may be inherited or caused by an environmental factor. See acquired; familial; hereditary.

con·gen·i·tal

(kŏn-jen'i-tăl) Do not confuse this word with hereditary, heredofamilial, familial, or genetic.
Existing at birth.
[L. congenitus, born with]

congenital,

adj present at birth and usually developed in utero.

congenital

present at and existing from the time of birth.

congenital articular rigidity
congenital defects
abnormalities of structure or function which are present at birth. They may or may not be inherited. There are a number of diseases, for example the lysosomal storage diseases, which may be inherited or environmental in causation, in which the insult is supplied while the fetus is in utero, but the defect does not become apparent until some time after birth. By definition these are not congenital defects although the animal is born with the metabolic lesion in place. See also individual defects listed by organ or system.
congenital erythropoietic porphyria
infectious congenital tremor
congenital loco
a congenital, inherited disease of domestic chickens characterized by opisthotonos, orthotonos, inability to stand, violent somersaulting. Affected birds die of starvation and dehydration.

Patient discussion about Congenital

Q. What is the treatment for an arachnoid cyst? My 15 year old son has just been diagnosed with an arachnoid cyst. What is the treatment? Is an operation necessary?

A. An operation is not always necessary, it depends on the size and location of the cyst. I suggest you take your son to a neurologist or a neurosurgeon for further consult.

More discussions about Congenital
References in periodicals archive ?
Ranajit Chakraborty and Aravinda Chakravarti, (17) in 1977 in their study stated that the incidence of major congenital defects was significantly higher among the inbred offspring (1.
The World Health Organization (WHO) (12) acknowledges that OCs require investment in public policies, in view of their high prevalence, their association with other congenital defects and co-morbidities and their need for prolonged treatment that requires efforts from all levels of healthcare.
Definitely we should have an ultrasound specialist who can confirm the clinical findings and can also diagnose the difficult problem like neonatal congenital defects specially of brain and spinal card, I.
Combined congenital defects of the anterior abdominal wall, sternum, diaphragm, pericardium and heart.
A large observational cohort study conducted in Denmark compared the outcomes of 1,106 pregnancies exposed to NSAIDs in the first trimester with 17,529 controls and found no significant association between NSAID use during pregnancy and congenital defects (BMJ 2001;322:266-70).
The Food and Drug Administration has stepped up warnings that paroxetine increases the risk of congenital defects, especially cardiovascular malformations.
Fearing overpopulation, Thomas Malthus argued in the late 18th century that the poor needed to die young, because Mother Nature had ordained their suffering from disease, malnutrition, and congenital defects.
Some 735 infants died largely due to perinatal infection and congenital defects, according to the report.
When parents complain about the shape of their child's iris, think congenital defects such as coloboma; Rieger's anomaly; aniridia; or acquired causes such as trauma, surgical defect, iris cyst, ciliary body melanoma, or synechiae, which is common in cases of trauma.
Intrauterine infections are known causes of congenital defects worldwide.
Minneapolis, MN, announced it has received a Humanitarian Device Exemption (HDE) from the FDA to market a bioprosthetic valved conduit to correct congenital defects of the right side of the heart in children.
Borah and colleague Marlene Rankin took pictures of 10 patients--five male and five female--with facial deformities from congenital defects, trauma, and cancer.

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