confound

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confound

(kŏn-fownd′) [L. confundere, to confuse, to pour together]
1. To introduce bias into a research study.
2. To confuse, bewilder, or mystify. confounding, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
To evaluate the effects of intrinsic (natural) fluorescence and quenching as confounding variables in fluorescence-based enzyme inhibition assays of natural products, we measured the fluorescence and quenching properties of 25 components of popular herbal products.
Race and overall GPA were found to be confounding variables and their effects were therefore statistically removed in analyses.
If peripheral blood is not available, heart blood may be obtained because it is less likely to be clotted, but the confounding variable of ethanol production by bacteria after death is introduced.
And many more of the nurses had a history of oral contraceptive use, a possible confounding variable, than the Framingham women.
After censoring deaths within 60 days of starting EECP as a potential confounding variable, researchers report the 1-year mortality in EECP completers as 4.
The other first-stage model relates a putative confounding variable to PM.
HERVs are, at a minimum, a confounding variable that needs to be investigated, de Harven notes.
The researchers noted previous evidence that a lower prevalence of breastfeeding among blacks, compared with other ethnicities, might be a confounding variable.
After adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, energy intake, body mass index, and other potential confounding variables, the odds ratios for fatty liver disease were 1, 1.
Data on daily average temperature, death rates, and confounding variables (eg, humidity and air pollution) were used to calculate the temperature of minimum mortality (the optimal temperature), and to quantify total deaths due to non-optimal ambient temperature in each location.
These variables include reliability of measures, validity of measures, intervention fidelity, missing data and attrition, potential confounding variables, and appropriateness of analysis.
The Penn study has examined data from more than three times as many geographic areas as earlier research and has controlled for numerous potential confounding variables previously unaddressed or only partially addressed.