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Abbreviation for erythema chronicum migrans.


abbreviation for erythema chronicum migrans.


Abbreviation for:
electronic claims management
embryo-conditioned media
endocrine cell micronests
endoscope-controlled microneurosurgery
epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis
erythema chronicum migrans
Every Child Matters 
experimental cerebral malaria
extended cervical mediastinoscopy
external cardiac massage
extracellular mass
extracellular matrix


External cardiac massage


(er?i-the'ma ) [Gr. erythema, redness]
Reddening of the skin. Erythema is a common but nonspecific sign of skin irritation, injury, or inflammation. It is caused by dilation of superficial blood vessels in the skin. erythematicerythematous (er?i-the-mat'ik) (er?i-them'at-us), adjective

erythema ab igne

Localized erythema due to exposure to heat.
Synonym: toasted skin syndrome.
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erythema annulare

A red, ring-shaped rash.
See: illustration

erythema cenicienta

Erythema dyschromicum perstans.

erythema chronicum migrans

Abbreviation: ECM
Erythema migrans.

erythema dyschromicum perstans

Awaiting Don's def.
Synonym: ashy dermatosis; erythema cenicienta

erythema elevatum diutinum

A form of vasculitis that affects the skin on the extensor surfaces of the forearms or legs. Iit is often seen in those infected with HIV.

erythema induratum

Chronic vasculitis of the skin occurring in young women. Hard cutaneous nodules break down to form necrotic ulcers and leave atrophic scars.
Synonym: Bazin disease

erythema infectiosum

A mild, moderately contagious disease seen most commonly in school-age children. Synonym: fifth disease


The causative agent is human parvovirus B-19. Transmission is thought to be via respiratory secretions from infected patients; however, maternal-fetal transmission can occur and hemolytic disease of the newborn may result.


Patients experience a mild, brief illness; complaints include fever, malaise, headache, and pruritus. The characteristic erythema appears about 10 days later. Facial redness is similar to that which occurs when a child is slapped; however, circumoral redness is absent. Several days following initial erythema, a less distinct rash may appear on the extremities and trunk. The rash usually resolves within 1 week but may occur for several weeks when the patient is exposed to heat, cold, exercise, or stress. Adults may also experience arthralgia and arthritis although these symptoms are less common in children. In addition, mild transient anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia may develop.


Most patients require no specific therapy. Patients with chronic hemolytic anemia may experience transient aplastic crisis (TAC). These patients should be warned of the danger of exposure to parvovirus B-19 infection, informed of the early signs and symptoms, and instructed to seek medical consultation promptly if exposure is suspected. Patients with TAC may develop a life-threatening anemia that requires immediate blood transfusion or partial exchange transfusion.

erythema intertrigo


linear gingival erythema

A band of inflammation of the periodontium, appearing as a reddish gingival band about 2 to 3 mm in width. It is often associated with HIV/AIDS. Synonym: red band gingivitis

erythema marginatum

A form of erythema multiforme in which the center of the area fades, leaving elevated edges.

erythema migrans

Abbreviation: EM
The hallmark of acute infection with Lyme disease. EM is an expanding red rash with a sharply defined border and (typically) central clearing. The rash usually appears within 3–32 days after a tick bite. The center of the rash is the site of inoculation. The causative agent is Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochete that may later invade the joints, the central nervous system, or the conducting system of the heart.
Synonym: erythema chronicum migrans See: Lyme disease for illus
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erythema multiforme

Abbreviation: EM
A rash usually caused by an immune response to drugs or to an infection, esp. herpes simplex virus. It may express itself on the skin in multiform ways, including macules, papules, blisters, hives, and, characteristically, iris or target lesions. It may involve the palms and soles, the mucous membranes, the face, and the extremities. The disease is usually self-limited. The most severe (and occasionally fatal) variant of the illness, in which the eyes, mouth, and internal organs are involved, is called Stevens-Johnson syndrome, or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Synonym: Hebra disease (1.) See: illustration

necrolytic migratory erythema

Abbreviation: NME
Red, blistering or crusting patches that appear on the skin of the buttocks, groin, lower extremities, or perineum. The lesions are itchy and painful. NME is often associated with glucagonomas.

erythema nodosum

A tender, red, nodular rash on the shins that typically arises in conjunction with another illness, e.g., such as a streptococcal, fungal, or tubercular infection; inflammatory bowel disease; occult cancer; or sarcoidosis. Biopsies of the rash reveal inflammation of subcutaneous fat (panniculitis). Because the disease is often associated with other serious illnesses, a diagnostic search for an underlying cause usually is undertaken. In some patients, no cause is identified.


Therapy is directed at the cause, when it is known. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs provide symptomatic relief for many patients.

erythema nodosum leprosum

Abbreviation: ENL
A red, nodular vasculitic rash, which may be a complication of the treatment for leprosy. See: lepra


Treatment consists of withdrawing therapy against leprosy (clofazimine, steroids, thalidomide).

punctate erythema

Erythema occurring in minute points, such as scarlet fever rash.

toxic erythema

Redness of the skin or a rash resulting from toxic agents such as drugs.

erythema toxicum neonatorum

A benign, self-limited rash marked by firm, yellow-white papules or pustules from 1 to 2 mm in size present in about 50% of full-term infants. The cause is unknown, and the lesions disappear without need for treatment.

erythema venenatum

Erythema caused by contact with a toxic substance.


(ma'triks) ('tri-sez?) plural.matrices [L. matrix, female animal kept for breeding (not a woman)]
1. The basic substance from which a thing is made or develops.
2. The intercellular material of a tissue.
3. Mold for casting amalgams in dental restoration.

bone matrix

The acellular part of bone.

extracellular matrix

Abbreviation: ECM
The solid or liquid material that is produced by and surrounds the cells of connective tissues.

nail matrix


territorial matrix

That component of cartilage immediately surrounding clusters of chondrocytes. It has a rich concentration of glycosaminoglycans, and stains darkly (it is basophilic).

umbilical cord matrix

Wharton's jelly.

matrix unguis


extracellular matrix

Abbreviation: ECM
The solid or liquid material that is produced by and surrounds the cells of connective tissues.
See also: matrix



external chest massage

; external cardiac massage; ECM rhythmic depression of anterior chest wall to compress the heart between ribcage and spine, to permit filling and emptying of the heart and maintain the circulation of oxygenated blood to brain and vital organs in the event of circulatory collapse; ECM is administered at a rate of 100 compressions per minute; if the patient is not breathing, 30 chest compressions (i.e. at the rate of 100 compressions per minute) alternated with two rescue breaths may be administered, to increase blood oxygen levels (see cardiopulmonary resuscitation)
References in periodicals archive ?
Vendors whose products are PVCS-enabled offer their customers a "best-of-breed" software configuration management solution that operates seamlessly in popular development environments.
Dwain Kinghorn, Altiris CTO, said, "By the end of the year, we will have more than ten security management solutions integrated with the Altiris service-oriented architecture and configuration management database.
Enterprise Configuration Management Database (CMDB) using a federated approach across various infrastructure types
Network Configuration Management SystemsCoTo integrate configuration change and compliance assurance across networks, servers and applications
Network device configuration management has primarily been a manual process involving typing commands into vendor-specific command line interfaces or creating homegrown scripts to ease retyping requirements.
In addition, during the past year, Voyence has experienced rapid growth, more than doubling its base of installed customers and securing the technology lead for network change and configuration management -- with support for a growing list of over 1,250 devices.
We've previously sold other network change and configuration management software, so we have an excellent understanding of customer needs in this critical area," says Paul Babicki, chief executive officer of Tabula Rosa Systems.
Customers involved with service level management, asset optimization, configuration management database (CMDB) initiatives, Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) best practices, or broader business service management goals all use Entuity's scaleable solutions to achieve their objectives.
The suite's back-office capabilities provide a higher level of automation and transparency to release, change and configuration management processes.

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